Westmoreland County approves drop box sites for mail-in ballots | TribLIVE.com

Starting Wednesday, Oct. 21, a drop box will be stationed from 8:30 a.m. to 8 p.m. seven days a week inside the lobby of the Westmoreland County Courthouse on Main Street in Greensburg. It will remain open through Election Day.

Drop boxes at Westmoreland County Community College on Fifth Avenue in New Kensington, Arnold Palmer Regional Airport in Unity and the county’s Adult Probation office on Riverview Drive in Monessen will open from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Saturday, Oct. 24.

On Sunday, Oct. 25, drop boxes will be available in the Student Achievement Center building at Westmoreland County Community College near Youngwood, and the community college building on Mellon Road in Murrysville from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Collections will resume Saturday, Oct. 31, at the community college sites in Murrysville and Youngwood from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. On Sunday, Nov. 1, from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., the drop boxes will be available at the WCCC building in New Kensington, the airport and the Monessen probation office.

“We tried to pick the four corners of the county (for drop box sites), but it was difficult,” said Commissioner Sean Kertes.

Drop boxes will be anchored to the ground, monitored by two county employees and video surveillance. Voters are only allowed to leave their own ballots. County staff will be on duty to enforce that.

“We wanted the drop boxes on the weekends for people who can’t make it to the courthouse. We thought weekends were best,” said Commissioner Gina Cerilli

Source: Westmoreland County approves drop box sites for mail-in ballots | TribLIVE.com

Feds, In Unusual Statement, Announce They’re Investigating Discarded Ballots

Federal authorities working in Pennsylvania say they’ve been asked to look into the discovery of some mailed ballots described as thrown away, but many aspects of the story remain unclear.

Source: Feds, In Unusual Statement, Announce They’re Investigating Discarded Ballots

Rule Changes In Swing States Mean More Votes Will Count, Results May Take Longer

Voters in a number of swing states this November will have more leeway in getting their mail ballots back in time to count, should rule changes announced in the past week hold up to legal challenges. But the changes could delay the reporting of election results and possibly set up court fights down the line.

In North Carolina, a settlement announced by the State Board of Elections said ballots postmarked by Election Day would count as long as officials receive them within nine days after the election.

And in Wisconsin, a federal judge similarly ruled Monday that ballots postmarked by Election Day would count as long as officials have them in hand within six days after Nov. 3.

Last week, Pennsylvania’s Supreme Court said ballots that are postmarked on or before Election Day will be counted so long as they’re received within the next three days.

And a Michigan state judge last week also ruled that absentee ballots postmarked by Nov. 3 can be counted if they arrive up to two weeks after Election Day.

Source: Rule Changes In Swing States Mean More Votes Will Count, Results May Take Longer