CDC chief Dr. Redfield says coronavirus deaths could start to fall next week

Director of the CDC Dr. Robert Redfield said that daily new cases still remain high and he’d like to bring that number down below 10,000 new cases per day.

KEY POINTS
  • Daily new cases of the coronavirus have been on a sustained decline since the end of July, according to data compiled by Johns Hopkins University.
  • Deaths, which lag behind new cases as people fall ill, become hospitalized and die, have remained stubbornly high, at roughly 1,000 new Covid-19 deaths per day, on average, according to a CNBC analysis of Hopkins data.
  •  “I think we’re going to start to see a decline in mortality across the country now next week as we continue to get control of these cases,” Director of the CDC Dr. Robert Redfield said Thursday.

Source: CDC chief Dr. Redfield says coronavirus deaths could start to fall next week

Wolf extends stay-at-home order for ‘red’ counties to June 4; more move to ‘yellow’ Friday | Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

Gov. Tom Wolf on Thursday extended the stay-at-home order to June 4 for all counties in the red phase of Pennsylvania’s COVID-19 reopening plan.

The stay-at-home order was originally set to expire on Friday. The governor’s office on Friday will announce additional counties moving to the yellow phase “at a to-be-determined date.”

All of southwestern Pennsylvania is currently in the red phase.

“[The] extension of the original order does not preclude counties moving into the yellow phase earlier than June 4,” Mark Nicastre, communications director for Mr. Wolf, said. “The extension of the overall order was necessary because it was expiring tonight.”

Allegheny County spokesperson Amie Downs said the county would wait until the governor announced the new yellow regions before making a comment on the stay-at-home extension.

County Executive Rich Fitzgerald recently expressed optimism about the county’s numbers, and hoped the county would open soon.

“It is our understanding that Gov. Wolf will be making an announcement on May 8, and we’re certainly hopeful that the southwest region does go from red to yellow,” Mr. Fitzgerald said this week.

The county has averaged 22 new cases per 100,000 people over the last 14 days, under the state’s target of 50 new cases.

Source: Wolf extends stay-at-home order for ‘red’ counties to June 4; more move to ‘yellow’ Friday | Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

Latrobe, Greensburg, New Kensington ZIP codes tops in Westmoreland for coronavirus cases | TribLIVE.com

The state Department of Health map includes information for all 67 counties.

The ZIP codes in Westmoreland County with the highest numbers of confirmed cases are Latrobe (15650) with 68, Greensburg (15601) with 38 and New Kensington (15068, including part of Allegheny) with 35, according to state figures. The county has 291 confirmed cases.

ZIP codes often include multiple municipalities or parts of several communities, such as 15068 — which includes New Kensington, Arnold, Lower Burrell, Upper Burrell and parts of Allegheny Township, Murrysville and Plum. The number of cases listed includes the entire ZIP code.

Allegheny County has reported positive covid-19 cases down to the municipal level using an online map since late March.

Source: Latrobe, Greensburg, New Kensington ZIP codes tops in Westmoreland for coronavirus cases | TribLIVE.com

What are the main modes of transmission for COVID-19? | Live Science

The new coronavirus has upended all of our usual calculus about seemingly ordinary activities. Is running past someone on the street safe? How about shopping in a grocery store with a 6-foot (2 meters) distance? And what about packages and takeout? And which of these activities poses the biggest risk?Unfortunately, there’s a lot we still don’t know about the way the virus that causes COVID-19 spreads.”At this point, I don’t think anyone can take a group of people with COVID, say how each person has become infected, and then say that xx% got infected with droplets and yy% got infected via touching surfaces,” Dr. Jeffrey N. Martin, a professor in the Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics at the University of California, San Francisco, told Live Science in an email. “I don’t think this kind of study has ever been done for any infection. In most individual persons, we do not know how the person got infected.

 

Coronavirus in the US: Map & cases 

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Source: What are the main modes of transmission for COVID-19? | Live Science

Pittsburgh food bank president worries about supply running out | TribLIVE.com

Lisa Scales has worked in food banks for nearly 25 years. She was involved in food distribution efforts in response to Hurricane Katrina in Louisiana and to the 9/11 attacks in New York.

She has never experienced anything like the need associated with the coronavirus pandemic.

“I have never seen a spike in need to this degree,” said Scales, president and CEO of the Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank. “I have never seen need like we’ve seen in the past several weeks in the Pittsburgh region and frankly across the country.”

Scales is facing a harsh reality that the current need for food is greater than the food bank’s supply can meet.

So far, the food bank has held four large-scale, drive-up distributions and served boxes of food to over 5,000 cars. It has more distributions planned and is developing other methods of getting food into the community. But Scales believes that in the midst of the covid-19 crisis, the food bank has met its match.

“It’s hard for me to say this, but the need is so significant that, despite our best efforts, I know that we will not be able to meet all of the need that’s in the community throughout the entirety of the crisis,” Scales said.

Source: Pittsburgh food bank president worries about supply running out | TribLIVE.com

Will zinc supplements protect against coronavirus? | Fox News

Dr. Manny explains whether you should be taking zinc supplements to help prevent COVID-19.

Dear. Dr. Manny, 

I’ve read that zinc supplements may help protect me against COVID-19. Is there any truth to that? 

Thanks for your question.

Right now, the most important measure that you can take to protect yourself from the novel coronavirus is social distancing, washing your hands, not touching your face and following the guidelines that the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has put out for self-quarantine.

However, I do understand your question.

MONITORING FOR CORONAVIRUS: WHAT IS AN OXIMETER? 

Zinc supplements have been touted for many years to be effective in shortening the phase of common colds, and there is data to support that impression.

There have been many randomized controlled trials that have shown that zinc supplements can inhibit replication of the common cold viruses and, therefore, reduce the average duration of a common cold.

Source: Will zinc supplements protect against coronavirus? | Fox News

Louisiana pastor who defied coronavirus order arrested on misdemeanor charges | Fox News

The pastor of Lousiana megachurch was arrested on misdemeanor charges for holding Sunday services for hundreds of followers in the face of a state-wide coronavirus large gathering ban.

The criminal action against Pastor Tony Spell comes a day after Rev. Rodney Howard-Browne, the pastor of another megachurch, River at Tampa Bay Church in Florida, was arrested and charged with violating a local coronavirus stay-at-home order when he held services over the weekend that drew large crowds.

Spell’s service Sunday drew an estimated 500 people of all ages to Life Tabernacle Church in Central.

On Tuesday Central police charged Spell with six counts of violating the Louisiana governor’s ban on large gatherings that was enacted to contain the sometimes-deadly coronavirus.

Source: Louisiana pastor who defied coronavirus order arrested on misdemeanor charges | Fox News