Murrysville woman takes Walgreens to court for taxing toilet tissue

PITTSBURGH (KDKA) – There are very few things we all need, and toilet paper is one of them. But did you ever look at your store receipt after buying it?  One Murrysville woman did and doesn’t like what she saw.

“It’s something that we all use. We all need to buy, and I have no idea why this is continuing to occur,” said consumer advocate Mary Bach. She’s got the time, the interest and the receipts.

“That’s correct. I do have the receipts,” she said.

She sent us her receipts from the Walgreens in Murrysville that show sales tax added to a purchase of toilet tissue.

Bach took Walgreens to court and the magistrate judge in Export sided with her. She says the fix would “take a nanosecond,” but it didn’t happen yet. She just filed a complaint against the Walgreens in Penn Hills for the same issue, planning to argue in front of the magistrate judge there in March.

Bach tells KDKA’s Meghan Schiller that people can visit the Pennsylvania Department of Revenue’s website for the full list of items not subject to sales tax in Pennsylvania.

Source: Murrysville woman takes Walgreens to court for taxing toilet tissue

Garland appoints special counsel to investigate Biden docs

WASHINGTON (AP) — Attorney General Merrick Garland on Thursday appointed a special counsel to investigate the presence of classified documents found at President Joe Biden’s home in Wilmington, Delaware, and at an unsecured office in Washington dating from his time as vice president.

Source: Garland appoints special counsel to investigate Biden docs

Pa. state police seized $65 million worth of illegal drugs last year

Pennsylvania State Police troopers got more than $65 million worth of illegal drugs off streets across the commonwealth in 2022, according to a report released Wednesday. That includes 547 pounds of cocaine and 348 pounds of fentanyl, with a combined street value of $20.9 million.

Source: Pa. state police seized $65 million worth of illegal drugs last year

Biden’s legal team found another batch of classified documents in search of second location | CNN Politics

President Joe Biden’s legal team found another batch of classified government records following the initial discovery of classified documents at his former think tank office in Washington this past fall, people briefed on the matter told CNN on Wednesday.

Searches for additional documents took place after Biden’s lawyers found the initial classified documents in early November, the people said. One of the sources told CNN that effort led to the discovery of additional documents of interest to federal officials reviewing the matter.

NBC News first reported the new batch of classified documents.

Source: Biden’s legal team found another batch of classified documents in search of second location | CNN Politics

Target 11 Exclusive: Pittsburgh police officers told not to follow controversial traffic stop policy

Acting Pittsburgh police chief Tom Stangrecki issued an order this week advising officers to return to the practice of enforcing minor traffic violations, such as broken headlights or expired inspection stickers.

The police bureau banned officers from enforcing those secondary traffic offenses after Pittsburgh City Council passed legislation last year barring officers from engaging in that practice.

Councilman Rev. Ricky Burgess sponsored the legislation that he said disproportionally targeted African American drivers.

Target 11 Investigator Rick Earle spoke with Councilman Burgess, who said he was unaware of the reversal and he had no idea why Police changed the policy.

EARLE: Do you think they are almost slapping this back in your face?

Rev. Ricky Burgess: I don’t take this personally, but again I just think they should reconsider it because I think it will actually have the reverse effect and make us less safe.

Burgess said he stands by the ordinance and the data supports it.

“We have shown through data that when you do these secondary stops it targets disproportionately African Americans and African American communities,” said Councilman Burgess.

Target 11 reached out to the city on Monday.

Download the FREE WPXI News app for breaking news alerts.

The city sent an emailed response Tuesday afternoon, stating that the move was made because of recent changes to state law.

Source: Target 11 Exclusive: Pittsburgh police officers told not to follow controversial traffic stop policy

Trump reacts as Jan 6 panel withdraws subpoena

Former president Donald Trump has gloated against “political thugs” as he said he did “nothing wrong” after the House select committee investigating the Jan 6 attack announced it would be withdrawing a subpoena against him.

In a statement on Truth Social, Mr Trump wrote: “Was just advised that the Unselect Committee of political Thugs has withdrawn the Subpoena of me concerning the January 6th Protest of the CROOKED 2020 Presidential Election.”

Source: Trump reacts as Jan 6 panel withdraws subpoena

Supreme Court keeps Title 42 border expulsions in place indefinitely, granting GOP-led petition

For nearly three years, the Title 42 public health law has allowed the U.S. to quickly expel hundreds of thousands of migrants to Mexico.

The Supreme Court on Tuesday allowed U.S. border officials to continue expelling migrants under a policy known as Title 42 indefinitely, granting a petition from Republican-led states to prevent the Biden administration from immediately ending the pandemic-related measure.

The high court decided to hear a request from 19 Republican-led states who were seeking to delay the end of Title 42, which was originally set to expire on Dec. 21 because of a lower court order that found the policy to be unlawful.

The Supreme Court will now hear arguments on whether it should allow the Republican-controlled states to defend Title 42’s legality during its February 2023 session. In the meantime, the court agreed to suspend the lower court order which had invalidated the expulsion policy. That means Title 42 will likely remain in place for several months pending the high court’s review.

Source: Supreme Court keeps Title 42 border expulsions in place indefinitely, granting GOP-led petition

Target 11 Exclusive: Pittsburgh Citizen Police Review Board considering action against city

Target 11 Investigator Rick Earle has learned that the Pittsburgh Citizen Police Review Board is considering issuing a subpoena to force the city of Pittsburgh to turn over documents they contend may shed critical information on three recent incidents involving officers who allegedly failed to follow orders.

Earle reached out to the city for an update on the status of the information requested by the CPRB.

A spokesperson told Earle that the Law Department is still reviewing the request.

Source: Target 11 Exclusive: Pittsburgh Citizen Police Review Board considering action against city

TRENDING NOW:

Charges dismissed against 15-year-old arrested in Kennywood shooting

A judge has dismissed all charges against a 15-year-old arrested in connection with the shooting at Kennywood Park back in September.

At a hearing Wednesday, the judge said there’s not enough evidence to support the charges against the teen.

The handgun investigators believe was used by the teen was found at the scene on the night of the shooting, but investigators said there was no DNA or fingerprint evidence on the gun or magazine linking the weapon to the teen.

Source: Charges dismissed against 15-year-old arrested in Kennywood shooting

Judge dismisses Wilkinsburg annexation petition

An Allegheny County judge on Friday dismissed a petition that sought to initiate annexation proceedings for Wilkinsburg to be incorporated into the City of Pittsburgh. The petition, filed on Sept. 29, was dismissed in a two-page order by Senior Common Pleas Judge Joe James. In the order, James wrote that the only acceptable procedure for annexation comes from Pennsylvania’s constitution, which requires a referendum in which a majority of voters from each municipality approve the merger.

Source: Judge dismisses Wilkinsburg annexation petition

Embattled British Prime Minister Liz Truss warned she has hours to save her job | CNN

LondonCNN — 

Liz Truss is fighting to save her job as Britain’s prime minister after more of her own lawmakers called for her to quit, incensed by a shambolic parliamentary vote and the resignation of her home secretary late on Wednesday.

Truss’s government has “12 hours” to “turn the ship around,” Conservative lawmaker Simon Hoare said on Thursday, after a vote on whether to ban controversial fracking for shale gas descended into chaos.

Lawmakers reported that aides for Truss manhandled MPs into the voting lobby to force them to vote against the ban. The government initially presented the vote as a confidence motion in Truss’s government, but confusion remains about whether it was. A Downing Street spokesperson said on Thursday that Conservative lawmakers who didn’t participate in Wednesday evening’s vote will face disciplinary action, PA Media said.

Source: Embattled British Prime Minister Liz Truss warned she has hours to save her job | CNN

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette newsroom workers go on strike

The Newspaper Guild of Pittsburgh said in a news release that Post-Gazette management failed to end what the guild calls the paper’s “illegally declared impasse to contract negotiations, lift the unilaterally imposed working conditions and reinstate the terms of the previous collectively bargained contract, and return to the contract bargaining table to reach a fair contract with the 101 journalists the Guild represents.”

“The workers who produce the Post-Gazette are taking a stand against the hostile and illegal treatment at the hands of John and Allan Block,” Newspaper Guild President Zack Tanner said in a statement. “We, the workers, are standing together today, ready to fight to win back our contract and work toward signing a new collective bargaining agreement that preserves the Post-Gazette for the Pittsburgh region.”

The Newspaper Guild said it has been in negotiations for a contract with PG management since 2017.

This is the second strike in recent weeks involving employees at the Post-Gazette. Workers from unions that are responsible for production, distribution and advertising at the Post-Gazette walked off the job Oct. 6.

Source: Pittsburgh Post-Gazette newsroom workers go on strike

Trump employee seen moving boxes on Mar-a-Lago security footage identified as former White House employee, source says

The video showing the boxes being handled is now in the hands of investigators and it contributed to the FBI’s decision to execute the search warrant at Mar-a-Lago in August, a source said.

Source: Trump employee seen moving boxes on Mar-a-Lago security footage identified as former White House employee, source says

PA Could Pass Law To Stem Book-Banning Tide

A state legislator wants to make it more difficult for school boards to arbitrarily ban books from school classrooms and libraries.

State Rep. Christopher Rabb’s forthcoming legislation would require the Pennsylvania Department of Education and school board seeking to ban a book to participate in at least two public hearings on the book in question. The hearings would be moderated by professionals with knowledge on the book and its contents, and would be required before a school board vote to ban the book.

“These book bans are an attempt to censor educators and restrict the information and educational materials that students can have access to in school,” Rabb, a Philadelphia Democrat, wrote in a memo to colleagues.

Source: PA Could Pass Law To Stem Book-Banning Tide

Jury awards former Allegheny County Jail captain nearly $1 million

PITTSBURGH —

A former Allegheny County Jail employee won a lawsuit over his firing, claiming he was retaliated against for reporting racist comments made about his family and coworkers.

This verdict comes roughly eight years after Captain Jeffery Kengerski was fired from his 13-year career as a corrections officer at the county jail.

Thailand Mass Shooting

 Thai Officials Visit a Community Grieving Dozens of Rampage Victims

Portraits of the dead, many of whom were killed at a day care center, began to emerge. Among them were a pregnant teacher and a 3-year-old who loved racing toy cars and riding in real ones.

Grieving family members began preparations to lay to rest the victims killed in a deadly rampage at a day care center in northern Thailand, as the country’s top officials arrived to console the devastated community struggling with unanswered questions about the attack that left 36 dead on Thursday.

Source: https://www.nytimes.com/live/2022/10/07/world/thailand-shooting

Pittsburgh school continuing remote learning after student accused of assaulting teacher

Pittsburgh Oliver Citywide Academy will continue learning remotely following the assault of a teacher.

A 15-year-old student is facing charges after he allegedly assaulted a teacher in the building on Thursday.

PREVIOUS COVERAGE: Student charged after assaulting teacher at a Pittsburgh school, police say

Source: Pittsburgh school continuing remote learning after student accused of assaulting teacher

Community condemns deaths in Allegheny County Jail as new survey reveals harrowing lockdown conditions | Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

Faith leaders and community members, including the mother of a 26-year-old man who died this March, honored the 16 men who have died in Allegheny County Jail since April 2020 on Thursday evening at an event organized by the Pittsburgh Interfaith Impact Network.

“If they were not in that jail, they would be alive today,” Brandi Fisher, president of the nonprofit Alliance for Police Accountability, told the crowd outside the Allegheny County Courthouse.

The event took place right before a tense jail oversight board meeting where the results of a survey taken at the height of the coronavirus pandemic revealed harrowing conditions inside the jail.

The group demanded immediate jail reforms

Source: Community condemns deaths in Allegheny County Jail as new survey reveals harrowing lockdown conditions | Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

California to Ban the Sale of New Gasoline Cars – The New York Times

The decision, to take effect by 2035, will very likely speed a wider transition to electric vehicles because many other states follow California’s standards.

California regulators on Thursday will vote to put in place a sweeping plan to restrict and ultimately ban the sale of gasoline-powered cars, state officials said, a move that the state’s governor described as the beginning of the end for the internal combustion engine.

The new policy, detailed Wednesday morning in a news conference, is widely expected to accelerate the global transition toward electric vehicles. Not only is California the largest auto market in the United States, but more than a dozen other states typically follow California’s lead when setting their own auto emissions standards.

If those states follow through, and most are expected to adopt similar rules, the restrictions would apply to about a third of the United States auto market.

Source: California to Ban the Sale of New Gasoline Cars – The New York Times

FBI’s sealed evidence that led to search of Trump’s home focus of court hearing | Reuters

Sealed records containing evidence the U.S. Justice Department presented to secure court approval to search Donald Trump’s Florida home will be at the heart of a hearing on Thursday, when news organizations will try to persuade a federal judge that the public deserves to see the details.

Source: FBI’s sealed evidence that led to search of Trump’s home focus of court hearing | Reuters

The FBI’s raid on Trump’s Mar-a-Lago: What we know, and what we don’t – Vox

Trump is possibly in legal jeopardy, but we don’t know yet what charges he could face, if any at all.

On Monday, FBI agents executed a search warrant at Mar-a-Lago, former President Donald Trump’s Florida home. Trump confirmed in a statement published online that his residence was “occupied by a large group of FBI agents,” although Trump himself was reportedly in New York when the search warrant was executed.

Little is known about the raid — or what, if any, further steps the Justice Department might take — but even this moment is politically and historically significant. There are constitutional rules regarding what law enforcement must do to justify searching private property, and the Justice Department has institutional norms on top of those about the treatment of political figures that could influence elections. It’s unlikely the decision to search Mar-a-Lago was taken lightly.

It’s not yet clear what specifically these agents were looking for during the raid, but CNN reports a few details about it. Among other things, the search “included examining where documents were kept” in Trump’s personal residence and office, and “boxes of items were taken.” Currently, the Justice Department is conducting two known investigations into Trump: one on his efforts to overturn the 2020 election and the ensuing January 6 attack on the US Capitol, and the other regarding Trump’s alleged mishandling of classified documents.

According to the New York Times, the search focused on material Trump brought from the White House to Mar-a-Lago after he left office — material that included classified documents and other documents subject to the Presidential Records Act, which requires official presidential documents to be turned over to the National Archives at the end of a presidency. Trump’s son Eric told Fox News something similar on Monday night.

Source: The FBI’s raid on Trump’s Mar-a-Lago: What we know, and what we don’t – Vox

Passenger fined $1,874 after two undeclared McMuffins found in luggage | CNN Travel

(CNN) — A passenger traveling from Bali, Indonesia to Australia has found themselves paying a hefty price for a McDonald’s breakfast.
The unnamed traveler was handed a fine of 2,664 Australian dollars ($1,874) after two undeclared egg and beef sausage McMuffins and a ham croissant were found in their luggage on arriving at Darwin Airport in the country’s Northern Territory last week.
The incident came about days after Australian authorities brought in tough new biosecurity rules after a Foot and Mouth disease (FMD) outbreak in Indonesia spread to Bali, a popular destination for Australian tourists.

Source: Passenger fined $1,874 after two undeclared McMuffins found in luggage | CNN Travel

Law firm accuses Allegheny Common Pleas judge of misconduct in 62 complaints | Pittsburgh City Paper

A local public interest law firm has filed 62 complaints against a county judge, who it accuses of “impatient, undignified, and discourteous” behavior and bias against Black men, older people, and people with mental or behavioral health issues.

Dolly Prabhu, an attorney with the Abolitionist Law Center who filed the complaints, says the misconduct allegations come from reports compiled by a group of mostly-volunteer court watchers who observed Judge Mariani in his courtroom for more than a year.

DARYA KHARABI

“Impatient, undignified, and discourteous”

Almost every complaint alleges “impatient, undignified and discourteous behavior towards defendants,” which, the complaints allege led to the violation of defendants’ right to be heard in court.

The complaints report dozens of incidents of Mariani shouting at defendants, refusing them the right to speak, and telling defendants he doesn’t believe them. Several complaints involve Mariani allegedly mocking and laughing at defendants. Prabhu also tells City Paper that court watcher reports indicate Mariani will often “scream for several minutes straight.”

Source: Law firm accuses Allegheny Common Pleas judge of misconduct in 62 complaints | Pittsburgh City Paper

Commonwealth Court Blocks PennDOT Plan To Toll Certain Bridges | Pittsburgh, PA Patch

CBS Pittsburgh

A state court on Thursday permanently blocked Gov. Tom Wolf’s plan to toll as many as nine major bridges on interstates in Pennsylvania, siding with three Pittsburgh-area municipalities that argued that his administration had violated procedures in getting to the advanced stage of considering the idea.

One key element on which the court agreed with the municipalities is the claim that PennDOT was required to propose specific bridges to toll when it asked the Public-Private Transportation Partnership Board in 2020 for permission to move forward with a bridge-tolling plan. It did not.

Wolf’s push for tolling comes as states increasingly look to user fees to make up for declining gas tax revenue that is not keeping up with the demands of fixing highways and bridges.

It also comes amid rising gas prices and spurred opposition from some communities and Republican lawmakers. Wolf himself only has eight months left in office, and neither of his potential successors in November’s election support it.

Source: Commonwealth Court Blocks PennDOT Plan To Toll Certain Bridges | Pittsburgh, PA Patch

Westmoreland commissioners halt public meeting after violation claim raised

 

Westmoreland County commissioners briefly walked out of their public meeting Thursday after an audience member accused them of violating the state’s open meeting law.

Westmoreland County commissioners briefly walked out of their public meeting Thursday after an audience member sitting in the front row shouted out an objection, claiming commissioners violated the state’s open meeting law.

The voting session was recessed for about 30 minutes to meet requirements of Pennsylvania’s Sunshine Law, which was amended by state lawmakers last year to require public bodies to post meeting agendas online at least 24 hours prior to the session.

Thursday’s 16-page agenda was posted on the county website at 2:18 p.m. Wednesday for the meeting that was to start at 1:30 p.m. Thursday.

“We just recessed and reconvened, waited for that 24-hour period to hit the mark, and came back,” said Commissioner Sean Kertes.

Source: Westmoreland commissioners halt public meeting after violation claim raised

ArabicChinese (Simplified)DutchEnglishFrenchGermanItalianPortugueseRussianSpanish
%d bloggers like this: