Community condemns deaths in Allegheny County Jail as new survey reveals harrowing lockdown conditions | Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

Faith leaders and community members, including the mother of a 26-year-old man who died this March, honored the 16 men who have died in Allegheny County Jail since April 2020 on Thursday evening at an event organized by the Pittsburgh Interfaith Impact Network.

“If they were not in that jail, they would be alive today,” Brandi Fisher, president of the nonprofit Alliance for Police Accountability, told the crowd outside the Allegheny County Courthouse.

The event took place right before a tense jail oversight board meeting where the results of a survey taken at the height of the coronavirus pandemic revealed harrowing conditions inside the jail.

The group demanded immediate jail reforms

Source: Community condemns deaths in Allegheny County Jail as new survey reveals harrowing lockdown conditions | Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

California to Ban the Sale of New Gasoline Cars – The New York Times

The decision, to take effect by 2035, will very likely speed a wider transition to electric vehicles because many other states follow California’s standards.

California regulators on Thursday will vote to put in place a sweeping plan to restrict and ultimately ban the sale of gasoline-powered cars, state officials said, a move that the state’s governor described as the beginning of the end for the internal combustion engine.

The new policy, detailed Wednesday morning in a news conference, is widely expected to accelerate the global transition toward electric vehicles. Not only is California the largest auto market in the United States, but more than a dozen other states typically follow California’s lead when setting their own auto emissions standards.

If those states follow through, and most are expected to adopt similar rules, the restrictions would apply to about a third of the United States auto market.

Source: California to Ban the Sale of New Gasoline Cars – The New York Times

FBI’s sealed evidence that led to search of Trump’s home focus of court hearing | Reuters

Sealed records containing evidence the U.S. Justice Department presented to secure court approval to search Donald Trump’s Florida home will be at the heart of a hearing on Thursday, when news organizations will try to persuade a federal judge that the public deserves to see the details.

Source: FBI’s sealed evidence that led to search of Trump’s home focus of court hearing | Reuters

The FBI’s raid on Trump’s Mar-a-Lago: What we know, and what we don’t – Vox

Trump is possibly in legal jeopardy, but we don’t know yet what charges he could face, if any at all.

On Monday, FBI agents executed a search warrant at Mar-a-Lago, former President Donald Trump’s Florida home. Trump confirmed in a statement published online that his residence was “occupied by a large group of FBI agents,” although Trump himself was reportedly in New York when the search warrant was executed.

Little is known about the raid — or what, if any, further steps the Justice Department might take — but even this moment is politically and historically significant. There are constitutional rules regarding what law enforcement must do to justify searching private property, and the Justice Department has institutional norms on top of those about the treatment of political figures that could influence elections. It’s unlikely the decision to search Mar-a-Lago was taken lightly.

It’s not yet clear what specifically these agents were looking for during the raid, but CNN reports a few details about it. Among other things, the search “included examining where documents were kept” in Trump’s personal residence and office, and “boxes of items were taken.” Currently, the Justice Department is conducting two known investigations into Trump: one on his efforts to overturn the 2020 election and the ensuing January 6 attack on the US Capitol, and the other regarding Trump’s alleged mishandling of classified documents.

According to the New York Times, the search focused on material Trump brought from the White House to Mar-a-Lago after he left office — material that included classified documents and other documents subject to the Presidential Records Act, which requires official presidential documents to be turned over to the National Archives at the end of a presidency. Trump’s son Eric told Fox News something similar on Monday night.

Source: The FBI’s raid on Trump’s Mar-a-Lago: What we know, and what we don’t – Vox

Passenger fined $1,874 after two undeclared McMuffins found in luggage | CNN Travel

(CNN) — A passenger traveling from Bali, Indonesia to Australia has found themselves paying a hefty price for a McDonald’s breakfast.
The unnamed traveler was handed a fine of 2,664 Australian dollars ($1,874) after two undeclared egg and beef sausage McMuffins and a ham croissant were found in their luggage on arriving at Darwin Airport in the country’s Northern Territory last week.
The incident came about days after Australian authorities brought in tough new biosecurity rules after a Foot and Mouth disease (FMD) outbreak in Indonesia spread to Bali, a popular destination for Australian tourists.

Source: Passenger fined $1,874 after two undeclared McMuffins found in luggage | CNN Travel

Law firm accuses Allegheny Common Pleas judge of misconduct in 62 complaints | Pittsburgh City Paper

A local public interest law firm has filed 62 complaints against a county judge, who it accuses of “impatient, undignified, and discourteous” behavior and bias against Black men, older people, and people with mental or behavioral health issues.

Dolly Prabhu, an attorney with the Abolitionist Law Center who filed the complaints, says the misconduct allegations come from reports compiled by a group of mostly-volunteer court watchers who observed Judge Mariani in his courtroom for more than a year.

DARYA KHARABI

“Impatient, undignified, and discourteous”

Almost every complaint alleges “impatient, undignified and discourteous behavior towards defendants,” which, the complaints allege led to the violation of defendants’ right to be heard in court.

The complaints report dozens of incidents of Mariani shouting at defendants, refusing them the right to speak, and telling defendants he doesn’t believe them. Several complaints involve Mariani allegedly mocking and laughing at defendants. Prabhu also tells City Paper that court watcher reports indicate Mariani will often “scream for several minutes straight.”

Source: Law firm accuses Allegheny Common Pleas judge of misconduct in 62 complaints | Pittsburgh City Paper

Commonwealth Court Blocks PennDOT Plan To Toll Certain Bridges | Pittsburgh, PA Patch

CBS Pittsburgh

A state court on Thursday permanently blocked Gov. Tom Wolf’s plan to toll as many as nine major bridges on interstates in Pennsylvania, siding with three Pittsburgh-area municipalities that argued that his administration had violated procedures in getting to the advanced stage of considering the idea.

One key element on which the court agreed with the municipalities is the claim that PennDOT was required to propose specific bridges to toll when it asked the Public-Private Transportation Partnership Board in 2020 for permission to move forward with a bridge-tolling plan. It did not.

Wolf’s push for tolling comes as states increasingly look to user fees to make up for declining gas tax revenue that is not keeping up with the demands of fixing highways and bridges.

It also comes amid rising gas prices and spurred opposition from some communities and Republican lawmakers. Wolf himself only has eight months left in office, and neither of his potential successors in November’s election support it.

Source: Commonwealth Court Blocks PennDOT Plan To Toll Certain Bridges | Pittsburgh, PA Patch

Westmoreland commissioners halt public meeting after violation claim raised

 

Westmoreland County commissioners briefly walked out of their public meeting Thursday after an audience member accused them of violating the state’s open meeting law.

Westmoreland County commissioners briefly walked out of their public meeting Thursday after an audience member sitting in the front row shouted out an objection, claiming commissioners violated the state’s open meeting law.

The voting session was recessed for about 30 minutes to meet requirements of Pennsylvania’s Sunshine Law, which was amended by state lawmakers last year to require public bodies to post meeting agendas online at least 24 hours prior to the session.

Thursday’s 16-page agenda was posted on the county website at 2:18 p.m. Wednesday for the meeting that was to start at 1:30 p.m. Thursday.

“We just recessed and reconvened, waited for that 24-hour period to hit the mark, and came back,” said Commissioner Sean Kertes.

Source: Westmoreland commissioners halt public meeting after violation claim raised

Uptown Bar Shut Down After Raid

PITTSBURGH (KDKA) – A bar in Uptown was shut down after a raid.

The state calls it a nuisance bar with complaints about drug activity and late-night noise and has been trying to shut it down for years. On Wednesday, agents once again raided Ace’s & Deuce’s lounge on Fifth Avenue and shut it down — at least for now.

Agents from the Nuisance Bar Taskforce descended on the bar shortly after 1 p.m. and by midday, the Allegheny County Health Department had shut it down for numerous violations. But the investigation goes deeper.

Detectives from vice and narcotics, state police and agents from the Liquor Control Board descended on the bar en masse much to the delight of the bar’s neighbor, the Bethlehem Haven Woman’s Shelter.

The shelter for women in recovery has been one of the major sources of complaints against the bar for drug activity and late-night noise. Executive Director Annette Fetchko calls it a threat to the health and safety of her clients.

Source: Uptown Bar Shut Down After Raid

Ex-Pittsburgh Public Schools teacher sues district over termination for right-wing Facebook post | Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

A former Pittsburgh teacher has sued the city school district and its board, saying she was improperly fired after she reposted a right-wing commentary critical of the “welfare state” on her personal Facebook page.

Denise Deltondo, who had been a math teacher, vice principal and kindergarten teacher with 27 years in the district, said administrators and the board “outrageously defamed her and stigmatized her as a racist and bigot,” suspended her and then fired her without a fair hearing.

Ms. Deltondo filed the suit Friday in U.S. District Court, alleging the district violated her rights to free speech and due process to defend herself.

Ms. Deltondo, who describes herself as a Donald Trump supporter, shared a post on her personal Facebook account on Aug. 9, 2020, of a clip that she says in her lawsuit “pointed out the hypocrisy of those who rely on public assistance complaining about ‘privilege’ while profligately spending that public assistance and living a life without the responsibility assumed by taxpayers.”

The post, reproduced in the lawsuit, says in part that “privilege is sending your kids to school early for the before-school programs and breakfast, and then keeping them there for the afterschool program…paid for by the people who DO HAVE TO DEAL WITH RISING TAXES AND COSTS! …you know, us so-called ‘PRIVILEGED’ the ones who pay while you TAKE TAKE TAKE!”

Ms. Deltondo said her only action was to write “awesome read!” in response to the post.

Her page did not identify her as a teacher.

Source: Ex-Pittsburgh Public Schools teacher sues district over termination for right-wing Facebook post | Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

Donald Trump, Don. Jr. and Ivanka must comply with New York attorney general subpoena, judge rules | Just The News

Former President Donald Trump and his two eldest children, Ivanka and Don Jr., must be interviewed under oath in New York Attorney General Letitia James’ (D) probe of the Trump Organization’s business practices.

The three Trumps are required to sit for a deposition within three weeks, Engoron ruled.

The order came after a two hour hearing with attorneys for the Trumps and James’ office, according to AP.

The ruling is likely to be appealed.

The former president defended his financial documents under question in James’ probe earlier this week.

Source: Donald Trump, Don. Jr. and Ivanka must comply with New York attorney general subpoena, judge rules | Just The News

U.S. COVID vaccine for children under 5 delayed by at least 2 months | Reuters

Feb 11 (Reuters) – A U.S. decision on Pfizer (PFE.N) and BioNTech’s COVID-19 vaccine for infants and children 6 months through 4 years of age has been postponed for at least two months after the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) said it needed more data.

The FDA had planned to decide on the vaccine based on early trial data as soon as next week with the government planning to roll it out on Feb. 21. It had asked Pfizer to speed up its application as the Omicron variant of the coronavirus caused a surge of infections, including among children.

On Friday, the agency said it had reviewed new trial information that arrived after Pfizer and BioNTech’s request for emergency authorization and decided it needed more data before weighing in on the authorization.

Source: U.S. COVID vaccine for children under 5 delayed by at least 2 months | Reuters

GOP senators claim secret service ‘hid’ Hunter Biden travel info

The Secret Service improperly redacted hundreds of pages of records related to Hunter Biden’s overseas travel — and apparently withheld information about trips to China, Russia and other countries, two leading Republican senators claim.

In a Tuesday letter to Secret Service Director James Murray, Sens. Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa) and Ron Johnson (R-Wis.) alleged the agency “hid names and other information contained in email conversations regarding Hunter Biden without any proper legal justification.”

The senators specifically noted that documents turned over at their request “do not show whether [Secret Service] personnel or Hunter Biden traveled to Kazakhstan in May or June 2014” during a trip to Paris.

Biden — whose father, President Biden, was vice president at the time — decided to ditch his Secret Service bodyguards before flying to Kazakhstan to pursue a deal on behalf of the Ukrainian energy company Burisma, the Washington Examiner reported last year.

Source: GOP senators claim secret service ‘hid’ Hunter Biden travel info

Trump Org: NY attorney general’s office says it has identified ‘misleading statements and omissions’ – CNNPolitics

 

In a court filing late Tuesday, investigators stated the office “intends to make a final determination about who is responsible for those misstatements and omissions,” adding that “OAG requires the testimony and evidence sought herein to determine which Trump Organization employees and affiliates — and which other entities and individuals — may have assisted the Trump Organization and Mr. Trump in making, or may have relevant knowledge about, the misstatements and omissions at issue.”
They write that “witnesses closest to the top of the Trump Organization have asserted their Fifth Amendment rights against self-incrimination. Certain others have professed faulty memories or asserted that they were following instruction from more senior employees.”

Source: Trump Org: NY attorney general’s office says it has identified ‘misleading statements and omissions’ – CNNPolitics

U.S. Supreme Court blocks Biden vaccine-or-test policy for large businesses

WASHINGTON, Jan 13 (Reuters) – The U.S. Supreme Court on Thursday blocked President Joe Biden’s COVID-19 vaccination-or-testing mandate for large businesses – a policy the conservative justices deemed an improper imposition on the lives and health of many Americans – while endorsing a separate federal vaccine requirement for healthcare facilities.

Biden voiced disappointment with the conservative-majority court’s decision to halt his administration’s rule requiring vaccines or weekly COVID-19 tests for employees at businesses with at least 100 employees. Biden said it now is up to states and employers to decide whether to require workers “to take the simple and effective step of getting vaccinated.”

It ruled 6-3, with the six conservative justices in the majority and three liberal justices dissenting, in blocking the rule involving large businesses – a policy that applied to more than 80 million employees. The court’s majority downplayed the risk COVID-19 specifically poses in the workplace, comparing it instead to “day-to-day” crime and pollution hazards that individuals face everywhere.

Source: U.S. Supreme Court blocks Biden vaccine-or-test policy for large businesses

Chicago parents sue teachers union over canceled classes

A group of Chicago parents is suing the Chicago Teachers Union (CTU) after teachers refused to return to in-person instruction due to COVID-19 concerns and school officials canceled classes entirely.

Attorneys at the Liberty Justice Center, representing a group of Chicago parents, filed a lawsuit Thursday night to end the union’s “illegal strike.”

Seventy-three percent of teachers in the union voted on Tuesday not to return to the classroom, alleging the city has not done enough to ensure they are protected against the coronavirus as cases spike in the state.

Source: Chicago parents sue teachers union over canceled classes

Jan. 6 protester claims in federal lawsuit that D.C. police beat her | Just The News

Victoria White filed a federal lawsuit against the Washington, D.C., police department claiming assault, battery and excessive force after officers allegedly beat her in the West Terrace tunnel of the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021.White claims she was hit by officers about 40 times in the head and face over the course of four minutes.

The lawsuit was filed in the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia and initially sought $1 million in damages, The Epoch Times reports.

Her attorney Joseph McBride points to three hours of surveillance footage from Jan. 6 released last month that allegedly shows White was pushed into the tunnel after she told the crowd not to enter the Capitol. Video reportedly shows White being hit by officers with batons and fists about 40 times over four minutes.

Epoch reports that McBride said he believes a Metro D.C. police supervisor is the officer in a white shirt on video was particularly violent and targeted White’s head and face with a steel baton and punches. The officer is labeled in the lawsuit as Officer John Doe 1.

The lawsuit seeks damages from D.C.’s Metropolitan Police Department and seven officers “with a dollar amount significantly higher than the preliminary ask of one million dollars,” McBride said. The suit alleges “unreasonable seizure/excessive force and violations of Due Process” and claims including negligence, assault, battery, and emotional distress.

Source: Jan. 6 protester claims in federal lawsuit that D.C. police beat her | Just The News

Supreme Court poised to decide limits of Biden vaccine mandates for businesses, health care workers | Fox News

The Supreme Court will hold a high-stakes public session Friday to decide whether the U.S. government can begin enforcing sweeping COVID-19 vaccine requirements.

With the Biden administration citing a “grave danger” to public health caused by unvaccinated Americans, the Supreme Court will hold a fast-tracked, high-stakes public session Friday to decide whether the U.S. government can begin enforcing sweeping COVID-19 vaccine requirements affecting nearly 100 million workers.

The justices will hear separate oral arguments over federal vaccine and testing rules for larger businesses and vaccine mandates for health care workers at facilities receiving Medicaid and Medicare funding. Enforcement of the policies – announced in November – has been put on holding pending resolution in the high court. Written rulings could come within a matter of days.

Source: Supreme Court poised to decide limits of Biden vaccine mandates for businesses, health care workers | Fox News

Pittsburgh council to vote on whether police can make minor traffic stops | TribLIVE.com

City Council on Monday continued debate about a measure that would prohibit Pittsburgh police from pulling people over for minor, secondary violations.

Though council was originally scheduled to vote on the legislation Monday, members delayed the final until next Tuesday at the request of Councilman Anthony Coghill, who has repeatedly voiced concerns about the proposal.

The legislation, introduced by City councilman Ricky Burgess in early November, would prohibit police from pulling over a driver for minor, secondary offenses, including:

  • Having a burned-out brake light or headlight.
  • Having an improperly displayed license plate or temporary tag, as long as it is visible.
  • Having a registration, inspection or emissions sticker that is expired by less than two months

Supporters have said the measure would address a disproportionate number of traffic stops involving people of color and reduce the likelihood of traffic stops escalating into violent incidents.

Councilman Bobby Wilson pointed to statistics provided by the city’s Crime Analysis Unit that showed that in 2016, more than 80% of people who were pulled over for secondary violations and then arrested for other charges were Black. By 2021, he said, that number jumped to 100%.

“I know this isn’t going to solve the whole issue of disparity,” he said. “We should look into why that’s happening, and I think that’s a good start.

Source: Pittsburgh council to vote on whether police can make minor traffic stops | TribLIVE.com

3 in custody after a Greene County home was surrounded by Pennsylvania State Police – WPXI

RICES LANDING, Pa. — Three people are in Pennsylvania State Police custody after being involved in a lengthy standoff in Greene County in Rices Landing.

State police surrounded a home on Bayard Avenue after trying serve an arrest warrant.

After some confrontation, police entered into a standoff with the person. After some time, police were able to place them in custody

Source: 3 in custody after a Greene County home was surrounded by Pennsylvania State Police – WPXI

Parents of suspected Michigan school shooter plead not guilty to manslaughter charges

James and Jennifer Crumbley, the parents of the teenager accused of killing four people in a Michigan high school shooting, pleaded not guilty to charges against them.

The couple was arraigned in court Saturday morning on four counts each of involuntary manslaughter. A judge set their bonds at $500,000 each, saying there is some concern about them being a flight risk because they had to be apprehended.

The couple’s attorneys had asked for a bond of $50,000 or $100,000 and denied that James and Jennifer Crumbley fled.

Jennifer Crumbley cried as she told the judge that she understands the charges against her. She and her husband both appeared virtually for the arraignment.

They are being represented by Shannon Smith and Mariell Lehman, who are from the same firm.

James and Jennifer Crumbley were arrested earlier Saturday morning in Detroit following a manhunt.

Source: Parents of suspected Michigan school shooter plead not guilty to manslaughter charges

14 arrested for L.A. smash-and-grab robberies all released on zero-bail policies

 

Over a dozen suspects tied to the spate of nearly a dozen smash-and-grab robberies in Los Angeles were busted but then quickly released due to zero-bail policies, which has left the LAPD’s top cop frustrated.

The 14 arrests followed a “rash” of 11 “flash-mob type” raids in which nearly $350,000 in goods was swiped in just 10 days in the City of Angels last month, with the last on Nov. 28, LAPD chief Michel Moore said Thursday.

“All of the suspects taken into custody are out of custody,” Moore complained, blaming “zero-bail criteria” for the release of all but one, who was a juvenile.

“There’s criminal elements that are recognizing that condition and are capitalizing on it,” he warned of crooks emboldened by the soft-touch approach.

Source: 14 arrested for L.A. smash-and-grab robberies all released on zero-bail policies

Federal court blocks Biden administration’s vaccination mandate – POLITICO

A federal court in Louisiana has blocked the Biden administration’s mandate that millions of workers get vaccinated against Covid-19 or be tested weekly, ruling in a suit filed by several states, companies and conservative religious groups.

“Because the petitions give cause to believe there are grave statutory and constitutional issues with the Mandate, the Mandate is hereby STAYED pending further action by this court,” a panel of judges for the New Orleans-based Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals ruled Saturday.

The states of Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, South Carolina and Utah are among the plaintiffs.

Source: Federal court blocks Biden administration’s vaccination mandate – POLITICO

Real estate heir Robert Durst found guilty of murdering his friend Susan Berman | Robert Durst | The Guardian

The multimillionaire New York real estate heir Robert Durst has been convicted of murdering his best friend Susan Berman more than 20 years ago, in a case that took on new life following the documentary The Jinx.

Durst was found guilty of first degree murder on Friday after a jury in Los Angeles deliberated for about seven hours over three days. Berman was shot at point-blank range in her Beverly Hills home in December 2000 as she was prepared to tell police how she helped cover up the killing of Durst’s wife.

Berman, the daughter of a Las Vegas mobster, was Durst’s longtime confidante who told friends she provided a phony alibi for him after his wife vanished.

Deputy DA Habib Balian holds the latex mask that Durst used as a disguise.
Deputy DA Habib Balian holds the latex mask that Robert Durst used as a disguise. Photograph: Getty Images
Durst’s strange story gripped viewers of the hit television documentary series The Jinx: The Life and Deaths of Robert Durst, which chronicled the disappearance of his wife Kathie in 1982, the cold-blooded murder of Berman in Los Angeles 18 years later, and the violent 2001 death of a roommate in Galveston, Texas, where Durst was living under cover as a deaf-mute woman.

Source: Real estate heir Robert Durst found guilty of murdering his friend Susan Berman | Robert Durst | The Guardian

Pennsylvania Turnpike: Free rides take big toll on finances

More than $104 million in Pennsylvania Turnpike tolls went uncollected last year as the agency fully converted to all-electronic tolling, with the millions of motorists who don’t use E-ZPass having a nearly 1 in 2 chance of riding without paying under the “toll-by-plate” license plate camera system.

An internal turnpike report issued in July and obtained by The Associated Press through a Right-to-Know Law request showed nearly 11 million out of the total of about 170 million turnpike rides generated no revenue for the agency in the year that ended May 31.

“We take this issue very seriously. It is a big number, there’s no question,” turnpike Chief Executive Mark Compton said. “But we, as an organization, are leaving no stone unturned in the way in which we’re going after that leakage.”

Toll revenue “leakage” – an industry euphemism for uncollected tolls – has become the focus of turnpike agencies across the country as the use of E-ZPass transponders and license plate cameras continues to spread.

It is a particular problem for the debt-strapped Pennsylvania Turnpike, where more than half of its total revenue goes to pay borrowing costs and tolls have more than quadrupled in 12 years for the minority of motorists who don’t have E-Z Pass to pay for rides.

Last year, license plates could not be identified in 1.8 million Pennsylvania Turnpike rides, bills were undeliverable in just over 1 million instances, and motor vehicle agencies failed to provide vehicle owner addresses more than 1.5 million times. An additional 6.7 million transactions were marked as “not paid.”

After tolls and fees go uncollected for about three years, the turnpike writes them off.

Source: Pennsylvania Turnpike: Free rides take big toll on finances

Second Amendment groups on Biden mandate: If he can force a needle in your arm, can he take your gun? | Fox News

Second Amendment supporters are expressing concern over President Biden’s move Thursday forcing large employers to vaccinate their employees, fearing that the logic behind the federal edict could be applied to confiscating guns or drastically limiting gun rights.

Biden announced that he is instructing the Department of Labor to mandate that all companies with 100 or more workers must vaccinate their employees or force them to be tested weekly.

WHITE HOUSE TO WITHDRAW CONTROVERSIAL ATF NOMINEE DAVID CHIPMAN

“This is not about freedom or personal choice,” Biden said. “It’s about protecting yourself and those around you, the people you work with, the people you care about, the people you love.”

Some supporters of the Second Amendment fear that Biden’s comments, downplaying freedom and touting federal government control of public health, represent a danger to the rights of gun owners.

20 GOP STATES PUSH BACK AGAINST BIDEN GUN REGULATIONS

“If Biden is allowed to impose regulations without a vote by Congress simply because he decides it helps ‘public safety,’ there is no limit to what he can do,” gun advocate John R. Lott, president of the Crime Prevention Research Center, told Fox News. “He could use this same reasoning to impose any gun control regulation that he wanted.”

Alan Gottlieb, Chairman of the Citizens Committee for the Right to Keep and Bear Arms, also expressed concern over Biden’s announcement.

Source: Second Amendment groups on Biden mandate: If he can force a needle in your arm, can he take your gun? | Fox News

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