Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Dead at 87, icon of women’s equality, opened doors for all

We take Ginsburg’s successes for granted now, but she was the one who brought to the Supreme Court the perspective of women’s rights.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg (/ˈbdər ˈɡɪnzbɜːrɡ/; born Joan Ruth Bader; March 15, 1933 – September 18, 2020),[1] also known by her initials RBG, was an American jurist who served as an associate justice of the Supreme Court of the United States from 1993 until her death in 2020. She was nominated by President Bill Clinton and was generally viewed as belonging to the liberal wing of the Court. Ginsburg was the second woman to serve on the U.S. Supreme Court, after Sandra Day O’Connor. Following O’Connor’s retirement in 2006 and until Sonia Sotomayor joined the Court in 2009, she was the only female justice on the Supreme Court. During that time, Ginsburg became more forceful with her dissents, which were noted by legal observers and in popular culture. Ginsburg authored notable majority opinions, including United States v. Virginia (1996), Olmstead v. L.C. (1999), and Friends of the Earth, Inc. v. Laidlaw Environmental Services, Inc. (2000).

Ginsburg was born and grew up in Brooklyn, New York. Her older sister died when she was a baby, and her mother died shortly before Ginsburg graduated from high school. She then earned her bachelor’s degree at Cornell University and became a wife to Martin D. Ginsburg and mother before starting law school at Harvard, where she was one of the few women in her class. Ginsburg transferred to Columbia Law School, where she graduated tied for first in her class. Following law school, Ginsburg entered into academia. She was a professor at Rutgers Law School and Columbia Law School, teaching civil procedure as one of the few women in her field.

Ginsburg spent a considerable part of her legal career as an advocate for the advancement of gender equality and women’s rights, winning multiple arguments before the Supreme Court. She advocated as a volunteer attorney for the American Civil Liberties Union and was a member of its board of directors and one of its general counsels in the 1970s. In 1980, President Jimmy Carter appointed her to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit, where she served until her appointment to the Supreme Court. Ginsburg received attention in American popular culture for her fiery liberal dissents and refusal to step down, leading to her being dubbed “The Notorious R.B.G.”, a play on the name of rapper The Notorious B.I.G.[2]

Ginsburg died at her home in Washington, D.C., on September 18, 2020, from complications of metastatic pancreatic cancer, at the age of 87.[3][4]

Source: Ruth Bader Ginsburg, icon of women’s equality, opened doors for all

Javicia Leslie Says It Feels ‘Powerful’ to Be the First Black Batwoman

The actress was joined by her new castmates Saturday to tease season 2 and playing a bisexual superhero.

New Batwoman Javicia Leslie knew immediately she had to play Ryan Wilder, the new character who takes over the mantle from Ruby Rose‘s Kate Kane as Gotham’s protector in the show’s upcoming second season.

“When I read the character description, it was definitely me. I love the idea that it’s goofy meets bada** meets a person who doesn’t like to be told what to do. A person who does not like to follow the rules. I loved the fact that Ryan was just who I am, just a hot mess!” Leslie joked during Saturday’s Batwoman panel at DC FanDome.

The timing of Leslie’s casting in July couldn’t have come at a better time. The God Friended Me alum shared during the panel that, in an interview just weeks prior, she mentioned that one of her biggest career goals was “to become a superhero.” (Leslie is the first Black actress to play Batwoman in a live-action TV series or film.)

Source: Javicia Leslie Says It Feels ‘Powerful’ to Be the First Black Batwoman

Robert Trump, brother of President Trump, dead at 71 | Fox News

President Trump’s brother Robert died at 71.

“It is with heavy heart I share that my wonderful brother, Robert, peacefully passed away tonight,” the president wrote. “He was not just my brother, he was my best friend. He will be greatly missed, but we will meet again. His memory will live on in my heart forever. Robert, I love you. Rest in peace.”

The president had traveled to New York on Friday to visit his ailing brother. A senior administration official had said the president “has a very good relationship with his brother and his brother is very special to him.”

Robert, who died just 11 days before what would have been his 72nd birthday, had reportedly spent more than a week in the intensive care unit at Mt. Sinai Hospital in New York City earlier this summer.

Source: Robert Trump, brother of President Trump, dead at 71 | Fox News

Annie Glenn, wife of late astronaut and U.S. Sen. John Glenn, dies of coronavirus

After learning to control a severe stutter, she became an advocate for people with communication disorders.

COLUMBUS, Ohio — Annie Glenn, the widow of astronaut and U.S. Sen. John Glenn and a communication disorders advocate, died Tuesday at age 100.

Glenn died of COVID-19 complications at a nursing home near St. Paul, Minnesota, said Hank Wilson, a spokesman for the Glenn College of Public Affairs at The Ohio State University.

At the time of John Glenn’s death in 2016, the two had been married 73 years. She had moved out of the apartment they shared in Columbus in recent years and gone to live with her daughter, Lyn, according to Wilson.

Annie Glenn was thrust into the spotlight in 1962, when her husband became the first American to orbit Earth. She shied away from the media attention because of a severe stutter.

Source: Annie Glenn, wife of late astronaut and U.S. Sen. John Glenn, dies of coronavirus

TV Q&A: Why are some daytime soaps in reruns? | Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

 

Q: Why is the daytime serial “General Hospital” now showing repeats on Fridays, calling them “Friday Flashbacks”? Are they rationing episodes due to the pandemic until they are able to shoot on a regular basis again or is it something else entirely?

-JOE VIA EMAIL

Rob: Soaps record their episodes months in advance, but even some of them have exhausted their pre-taped inventory during the COVID-19 pandemic with the ABC show expected to run out of original episodes by the end of May.

So, yes, the Friday reruns of “General Hospital” are an effort to stretch out new episodes longer. TheWrap.com reports “GH” is also adding flashbacks to new episodes in another effort to stretch out the run of original episodes.CBS soaps “The Young and the Restless” and “The Bold and the Beautiful” went into reruns on April 25 and are now airing theme weeks of reruns. This week “Y&R” features episodes dating back to 1981 for “Victor and Nikki: A Lifetime of Love,” while “B&B” reaches back to 1991 for its “Epic Weddings Week.”NBC’s “Days of our Lives” is in better shape with enough original episodes stockpiled to see the show through to October.

Source: TV Q&A: Why are some daytime soaps in reruns? | Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

BREAKING: Legendary Miami Dolphins coach Don Shula dead at age 90 – Sports – The Palm Beach Post – West Palm Beach, FL

Don Shula was arguably the greatest coach in the 100-year history of the National Football League as measured by his record 347 victories. He won two Super Bowls with the Dolphins, including a perfect season.

Two words, simply scrawled on a blackboard in the corner of a locker room. Amid all the celebrating and champagne and cameras, the message easily could have gone unnoticed, or faded from memory, if not so perfect.

BEST EVER.

An equipment man had written that in honor of the 1973 Miami Dolphins, who had just won their second consecutive Super Bowl. And although a wide smile managed to pierce the stern jaw of Don Shula when he saw it while walking out to pick up the trophy, years would pass before anyone, Shula included, could fully appreciate them.

BEST EVER. That’s Donald Francis Shula, who died Monday at age 90.

Shula was the greatest coach in the 100-year history of the National Football League as measured by his record 347 victories, that beacon of a bottom line he so treasured.

>>READ MORE: In one of Don Shula’s last interviews, he talked favorite career moment, future of the team

How strange that this morning, his legacy shines even brighter through the prism of the greatest loss that could ever be associated with him — the loss of the man himself.

Gone is an icon, a man who could stand alongside Henry Flagler for the sculpting of a Mount Rushmore for Florida. It’s not simply because he won some football games, or even all of them in that glorious 17-0 season of 1972.

It’s the manner in which he did so: stressing a work ethic, respect and integrity in a way that grabbed Larry Csonka and Dan Marino by the collar just as surely as it did the brick layer in Hialeah and the landscaper in Lantana.

Don Shula made us feel better about calling ourselves South Floridians.

Source: BREAKING: Legendary Miami Dolphins coach Don Shula dead at age 90 – Sports – The Palm Beach Post – West Palm Beach, FL