Updated CDC guidance says coronavirus can spread through the air

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention updated guidance on its website to say coronavirus can commonly spread “through respiratory droplets or small particles, such as those in aerosols,” which are produced even when a person breathes.

“Airborne viruses, including COVID-19, are among the most contagious and easily spread,” the site now says.

Previously, the CDC page said that COVID-19 was thought to spread mainly between people in close contact — about 6 feet — and “through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs, sneezes or talks.”

The page, updated Friday, still says COVID-19 most commonly spreads between people who are in close contact with one another, and now says the virus is known to spread “through respiratory droplets or small particles, such as those in aerosols, produced when an infected person coughs, sneezes, sings, talks or breathes.”

These particles can cause infection when “inhaled into the nose, mouth, airways, and lungs,” it says. “This is thought to be the main way the virus spreads.”

Protect yourself and others

The best way to prevent illness is to avoid being exposed to this virus. You can take steps to slow the spread.

Learn more about what you can do to protect yourself and others.

Source: Updated CDC guidance says coronavirus can spread through the air

CDC chief Dr. Redfield says coronavirus deaths could start to fall next week

Director of the CDC Dr. Robert Redfield said that daily new cases still remain high and he’d like to bring that number down below 10,000 new cases per day.

KEY POINTS
  • Daily new cases of the coronavirus have been on a sustained decline since the end of July, according to data compiled by Johns Hopkins University.
  • Deaths, which lag behind new cases as people fall ill, become hospitalized and die, have remained stubbornly high, at roughly 1,000 new Covid-19 deaths per day, on average, according to a CNBC analysis of Hopkins data.
  •  “I think we’re going to start to see a decline in mortality across the country now next week as we continue to get control of these cases,” Director of the CDC Dr. Robert Redfield said Thursday.

Source: CDC chief Dr. Redfield says coronavirus deaths could start to fall next week

Chicken is often the culprit in U.S. food poisoning cases, according to CDC report

The CDC says that the increases could be the result of new diagnostic tools that help identify more cases.

As recent illnesses tied to raw turkeyground beefcut melon and romaine lettuce suggest, U.S. food poisoning cases don’t appear to be going away anytime soon.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said in a report Thursday that the frequency of several types of food poisoning infections climbed last year, but that the increases could be the result of new diagnostic tools that help identify more cases.

Overall, the agency believes food poisoning rates have remained largely unchanged

Source: Chicken is often the culprit in U.S. food poisoning cases, according to CDC report

CDC Reports Largest U.S. Measles Outbreak Since Year 2000

There are 695 cases in 22 states. HHS Secretary Alex Azar said the spike was “avoidable” and he called measles vaccines “among the most extensively studied medical products we have.”

The agency attributed the high number of cases primarily to a few large outbreaks — one in the state of Washington and two others in New York City and New York state. The New York outbreaks are among the largest and longest lasting since 2000.

“The longer these outbreaks continue, the greater the chance measles will again get a sustained foothold in the United States,” the CDC said.

Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar said, in a statement, said the rise in measles cases is “avoidable.”

“Measles is not a harmless childhood illness, but a highly contagious, potentially life-threatening disease,” he said. “We have the ability to safely protect our children and our communities. Vaccines are a safe, highly effective public health solution that can prevent this disease. The measles vaccines are among the most extensively studied medical products we have, and their safety has been firmly established over many years in some of the largest vaccine studies ever undertaken.”

Source: CDC Reports Largest U.S. Measles Outbreak Since Year 2000