Police suspect man killed New York girl he met on Instagram and shared photos of her body online | Fox News

A man, 21, found seriously injured near the body of a 17-year-old girl is suspected of killing the teen and posting photos of her body on Instagram, where they’d first met digitally, police said Monday.

Source: Police suspect man killed New York girl he met on Instagram and shared photos of her body online | Fox News

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Get Ready To Buy Google, Apple, Facebook And Amazon

France just imposed a 3% tax on the French revenues of Google, Apple, Facebook and Amazon. But these companies are not going to be any less profitable because of the tax. If Google, Apple, Facebook or Amazon sells-off because of the new French digital tax, get ready to buy.

As with all corporate taxes, there is a widespread misunderstanding as to who actually pays the tax. Since in order to stay in business, customers have to cover all of a company’s costs — including taxes — it is customers who ultimately pay the taxes.

Source: Get Ready To Buy Google, Apple, Facebook And Amazon

Twitter down: Social media platform goes offline for an hour – CNN

The tweets went silent for a time on Thursday.

San Francisco (CNN Business)The tweets went silent for a time on Thursday.

Social media service Twitter (TWTR) was not working for about an hour on Thursday afternoon. The company says some people may now be able to access the site again.
Twitter said in a statement Thursday afternoon that it was “currently investigating issues people are having accessing Twitter.”
Users can continue to monitor the site’s status at status.twitterstat.us. It’s unclear at this time how extensive the outage was or its exact length.
“The outage was due to an internal configuration change, which we’re now fixing,” Twitter said in an update it posted to the status monitoring site.
The site’s outage coincided with the start of the White House’s Presidential Social Media Summit. Twitter, along with Facebook (FB), wasn’t invited to the summit, while a number of right-wing extremists were.

Source: Twitter down: Social media platform goes offline for an hour – CNN

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez sued over blocking people on Twitter – BBC News

Former New York state assemblyman Dov Hikind and Joseph Saladino, a YouTube personality running for Congress, have filed the claims.

Both cite a recent ruling against President Donald Trump, which said he was breaking the law by blocking critics on the social media platform.

The men say the law should apply to all politicians.

“Trump is not allowed to block people, will the standards apply equally?” Mr Saladino tweeted.

And a feud with House Speaker Nancy Pelosi escalated after Congress passed a border funding bill that four young Democrats opposed. Pelosi discussed the bill, and those in her party who oppose it, in an interview last weekend. She told the New York Times: “All these people have their public whatever and their Twitter world, but they didn’t have any following. They’re four people, and that’s how many votes they got.”

Ocasio-Cortez said to The Washington Post on Wednesday that the “persistent singling out” by the Speaker may be more than “outright disrespectful.”

In an earlier interview with The New Yorker Radio Hour, Ocasio-Cortez accused Congress of using  women and minorities as “bargaining chips.”

Source: Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez sued over blocking people on Twitter – BBC News

Source: https://www.foxnews.com/politics/ocasio-cortez-pelosi-singling-out-women-color

After Putin falls during exhibition hockey game, a social media frenzy | Fox News

Russian President Vladimir Putin took a spill on Friday as he waved to fans at an exhibition hockey game in Sochi which featured several former NHL players.

The 66-year-old was waving to fans as he circled the rink at the Bolshoi Arena in the Black Sea resort of Sochi when he inadvertently raced toward the edge of a red carpet that had been placed on the ice.

Two of Putin’s teammates on the “Legends” tried to catch him but the Russian leader fell before they could reach him.

The fall inspired a frenzy of posts on social media mocking Putin and his authoritarian rule, and jokingly suggesting that someone would pay dearly for his or her role in the mishap.

Source: After Putin falls during exhibition hockey game, a social media frenzy | Fox News

Trump blasts Twitter as ‘very discriminatory,’ says the social-media company removes his followers

In two tweets on Tuesday morning, President Donald Trump went after Twitter over what he said were discriminatory practices.

Source: Trump blasts Twitter as ‘very discriminatory,’ says the social-media company removes his followers

BlackBerry Messenger is shutting down for consumers on May 31st | PhoneDog

It’s time to pour one out, because BlackBerry Messenger is shutting down.

It was announced today that the consumer version of BBM is closing on May 31st, 2019. After that date, the BBM app will stop working. Emtek, who licensed the BBM consumer business from BlackBerry in 2016, says that BBM stickers and BBMoji can’t be exported out of the app, so you won’t be able to use them after the shutdown. You can issue refunds of your in-app purchases for stickers that you’ve bought, though.

Source: BlackBerry Messenger is shutting down for consumers on May 31st | PhoneDog

(stuf.co.nz) – Teen conservative star CJ Pearson apparently hoaxed the White House

 

CJ Pearson has gained a considerable amount of attention for his comments regarding Barack Obama.

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CJ Pearson has gained a considerable amount of attention for his comments regarding Barack Obama.

On Thursday afternoon, 13-year old CJ Pearson warned his 43,900 followers not to believe what they read.

The US teenager, whose activism and online success had made him a youth outreach chairman for Republican Ted Cruz, had been trading messages with a reporter for Glenn Beck’s news site, The Blaze.

Oliver Darcy, a reporter for the site, was asking Pearson to prove – as he had claimed, to great viral attention – that US President Barack Obama had truly blocked him on Twitter. In lieu of proof, Pearson was calling for help.

“In a few minutes, @oliverdarcy is going to release a hit article on me and I’m going to take it,” Pearson wrote..”Because here’s what the PR folks are saying: say you lied and apologise to avoid backlash. But, instead, I choose to stand by my word. While the article will be incriminating, all we have in politics is our word and I stand by it. Nevertheless, I’m disappointed in @theblaze.”

It was one of the more confusing moments in a story born to confuse. Coreco JaQuan Pearson’s profile had been growing well before the Twitter story, thanks to his precocious and silver-tongued video denunciations of the president.

The most successful had come just this month, when Pearson locked his eyes on a webcam and asked – rhetorically – why a president who so blatantly disrespected police officers had so quickly invited Texas teenager Ahmed Mohamed to the White House, after being disciplined for bringing to school a homemade clock that administrators mistook for a bomb.

“Mr President, when cops are being gunned down, you don’t invite their family to the White House,” Pearson said. “You never did. But when a Muslim kid builds a clock? Well, come on by.”

The video was viewed nearly two million times and inspired dozens of profiles, including one in The Washington Post.

People trying to understand the Pearson phenomenon got it quickly. Wunderkinds arise on the right with some frequency. In 2009, it was 13-year old Jonathan Krohn – also a Georgian – giving a speech at the Conservative Political Action Conference and becoming a quasi-celebrity.

In 2013 it was Benji Backer, a 16-year old Wisconsinite whose story of high school administrators suppressing his political views got him onstage at CPAC and other conferences.

Neither Krohn nor Backer took to stardom. By 2012, Krohn was renouncing his old views in a series of interviews, and taking on a new life as a journalist. Backer’s exit was quicker: By 2015, he worried that a political life was making him “selfish.”

Pearson entered the political life with gusto, and no qualms. His first video, in February, was inspired by former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani ranting to a room of conservative donors (and a pre-presidential bid Scott Walker) that President Obama did not love America.

“I don’t want to be politically correct,” said Pearson. “I don’t care about being politically correct at this point. President Obama: You don’t love America. If you loved America, you would call ISIS what it is… if you loved America, President Obama, you wouldn’t try to take away what hard-working Americans have worked for their entire lives.”

That video scored two million views, success Pearson wouldn’t achieve on YouTube again until this month. But it was enough. By May, Pearson had a five-minute interview with Cruz that teed up the candidate’s favourite talking points.

“Have we not maintained our promise to the American people to repeal Obamacare?” Pearson asked.

“CJ,” said Cruz, “you’re exactly right.”

Pearson became a fervent Cruz supporter; in September, the Cruz campaign announced his new role as the head of “Teens for Ted,” and Pearson added a TedCruz.org email address to his Twitter profile. Simply by speaking his mind, Pearson had become a conservative star.

READ MORE:

Barack Obama’s Twitter account blocks 13-year-old critic

There was one catch. Pearson had done more than speak. He’d left the impression that his speech was being silenced. In March, after the Giuliani video went viral, Pearson’s Facebook account was closed.

He was 12 years old when he shot the video, and as Facebook told reporters, no one could have an account until age 13. Pearson was not having it.

He told a local Fox News affiliate that the First Amendment was “obviously not a big concern to the powers that be at Facebook.”

He told national Fox News that “time and time again, Facebook has shut down many conservative accounts after they decide to speak up.”

No one had really been denied access to Pearson’s speech, and he quickly solved the age problem by setting up a Facebook fan page and turning 13.

But just four months later, Pearson announced that he would “take a break from politics and commentary.” The reason was a complicated and quickly terminated fight with an obscure Twitter account with only (as of right now) 33 followers and no public profile.

Jon Richards, a blogger for Georgia’s PeachPundit, noticed that the most toxic aspect of the fight came from an account that egged it on with a racial slur. That account was easily traced back to Pearson.

Nothing came of either story, though, and Pearson started this week with more visibility than ever.

A spokesman for the Republican National Committee tweeted that he’d “love to discuss” a speaking role for Pearson. Business Insider upgraded him from a rising star to a “leading 13-year old pundit.” And then, Pearson tweeted what he claimed was a screenshot of @BarackObama blocking his account.

At first, no one questioned this. Twitchy, the conservative site that aggregates Twitter wars, reported that the White House was “afraid of a 13-year-old boy.”

The Daily Caller matter-of-factly reported that Pearson had been blocked, as did Breitbart, as did other conservative news sites. White House assistant press secretary Frank Benenati swiftly tweeted that Pearson was wrong, and that “nobody is or has ever been blocked from the @POTUS twitter account.”

That sent skeptics looking for cases where the account had blocked hostile accounts, and it inspired a new video from Pearson – which would be viewed half a million times – denouncing the White House for lying about him.

“They lied about Benghazi,” he said, in high dudgeon. “They lied about the IRS. They lie about every issue of importance to the American people.”

But other online sleuths could tell that something was off. First, a subsequent Pearson tweet revealed that he was still following @BarackObama.

Second, there was no timestamp or external information on the tweet, and the kerning on the standard text “learn more” was skewed. Coincidentally, a popular parody account had previously tweeted an identical image (now deleted) of an Obama “blocking,” with the same kerning.

Oliver Darcy, a reporter for the Blaze, dug into all of this and contacted Pearson. The wunderkind initially told him that he’d taken the shot on a Droid tablet.

In the video, Pearson had claimed that he saw the blocking when he “got home,” not specifying what device he’d used.

As more questions swirled online, Pearson warned his fans that the “incriminating” piece was coming, but never said publicly whether it could be trusted.

Then, two hours after Darcy’s piece went online, Pearson issued a fresh Facebook statement. “I’m not responding to fraudulent attacks on my character by the left nor RINOs,” Pearson wrote.

“My friend sent me the screenshot, since I accessed my account using his phone. I saw it with my own eyes. Time to move on.”

Benji Backer watched the events unfold with disgust. After a short conversation, he pointed to the tweetstorm he’d written after reading the Blaze piece, about how “young conservatives have made the movement look foolish.” He wasn’t a part of that, but he knew Pearson was headed for a fall.

“I tried to give CJ advice,” Backer wrote.

“And I know he’s going to lash out at me now. But we used to work together. I told him he had promise but that he had to keep it in perspective, truth [sic] and stay humble. Stardom can ruin those things and it did for him. CJ & I (when I was still in politics) were going to work on some things.

“But he didn’t like advice and he wanted ‘his brand’ to grow instead. People, including myself, tried to help CJ. I really thought he could do great things. But he wasn’t willing to listen. Most of all, CJ lied to me. Numerous times. And many people I know and love. That’s when I knew there was a problem.”

Reached on Twitter and at his campaign email account, Pearson did not respond to questions. According to Cruz spokesman Rick Tyler, CJ Pearson remains part of the campaign.

 – The Washington Post

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