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History Opinion Technology

Why Technology Advanced So Quickly the Past 200 Years | Intellectual Takeout

Technology has advanced exponentially since the Industrial Revolution 200 years ago. But why?

That’s a question I’ve frequently wondered about, and one that Lewis Mumford sought to answer in his 1934 classic Technics & Civilization.

Below are four of the ideological shifts that Mumford believes prepared the way for the modern development of technology:

1) The Invention of the Clock

The invention of the mechanical clock—which appeared in medieval cities in the 13th century—was prepared for by the European monasteries, which desired to create a more ordered and regulated existence apart from the chaos that dwelt outside their walls.

2) A Changed Understanding of Space and Movement

The Middle Ages tended to conceive space as primarily symbolic of the divine. According to Mumford, “a revolutionary change in the conception of space took place” between the 14th and 17th centuries,

3) The Influence of Capitalism

The shift from a barter economy to a capitalist one brought about “constant reference to abstract symbols of wealth: gold, drafts, bills of exchange, eventually merely numbers.

4) A Turn from the Supernatural to the Natural

“Meanwhile, with the transformation of the concepts of time and space went a change in the direction of interest from the heavenly world to the natural one… Nature [now] existed to be explored, to be invaded, to be conquered, and finally, to be understood.”

Source: Why Technology Advanced So Quickly the Past 200 Years | Intellectual Takeout

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Disasters Europe Floods History News Opinion

With Waters Rising And Its Population Falling, What Is Venice’s Future?

Rising sea levels are not the only threat to Venice. As residents continue to leave, the city risks becoming an empty shell sinking under mass tourism. Some 30 million visitors arrive every year.

Source: With Waters Rising And Its Population Falling, What Is Venice’s Future?

Categories
Business Disasters History Legal News Opinion

Bumble Bee Foods Files for Bankruptcy

NATIONWIDE — Bumble Bee Foods, one of America’s largest tuna brands, filed for bankruptcy Thursday.

  • 120-year-old Bumble Bee Foods files for bankruptcy
  • It pleaded guilty in 2017 in tuna price-fixing scheme
  • Taiwan-based company plans to bid almost $1 billion

The company says it’s selling its assets to Taiwan-based FCF Co. for $925 million.

The sale could be finalized within 60 to 90 days.

Bumble Bee CEO Jan Tharp said in a statement that “it’s been a challenging time for our company,” but the move should allow the brand to continue business as usual, CNN reported. The brand also sells sardines, clam juice, and other fish products.

This announcement comes more than two years after the brand, owned by London-based Lion Capital, pleaded guilty in a tuna price-fixing scheme. Major grocery chains including Albertsons, Kroger, and Walmart had sued Bumble Bee, StarKist and the maker of Chicken-of-the-Sea.

Source: Bumble Bee Foods Files for Bankruptcy

Categories
crime History News Opinion Politics

Jared Cohen: JFK’s death — THIS is what Condoleezza Rice, Dick Cheney, Jesse Jackson, others will never forget | Fox News

Fifty-six years ago this week, President Kennedy arrived in Dallas, Texas as part of a multi-day campaign stop. The president’s aides were uncomfortable. The Texas crowds were unfriendly and rowdy. “If anybody really wanted to shoot the president of the United States,” Kennedy told his aide Kenneth O’Donnell on the morning of November 22, “it was not a very difficult job—all one had to do was get a high building someday with a telescopic rifle, and there was nothing anybody could do to defend against such an attempt.”

That same morning, he made a joke to Jackie: “We’re heading into nut country today. . . . You know, last night would have been a hell of a night to assassinate a President.”

President Kennedy was shot at 12:30 p.m. (CST) on that day as his open limousine made its way through Dealey Plaza. He was pronounced dead 30 minutes later. His death marked the first assassination in 62 years, but unlike the McKinley murder, the entire country followed events in real-time

Everybody has a Kennedy story. He was both loved and reviled by so many people and was taken so fast and so publicly for it to not have left an indelible mark on anyone who lived through it. It was also a period of heightened tensions – Vietnam, civil rights, nuclear showdowns – that coincided with the rise of an outspoken counterculture movement of activists and dissidents alike.

Even in his nineties, President George H.W. Bush’s memory of the day was crystal clear. “I was running for the U.S. Senate,” he told me in an interview for my book, Accidental Presidents, “and Bar and I were in Tyler, Texas. We had a bunch of events that day and [the] next. We canceled them all and went home to Houston to be with our kids.”

For him, the impact became very real, noting that, “I am not sure President Kennedy would have gotten the Civil Rights legislation passed. LBJ is maybe the only person at that time who could have pulled that off. You had a Southern President calling his former Senate colleagues in the South, and in that wonderful Texas drawl of his, telling them to do the right thing. JFK’s Boston twang would not have had the same effect. LBJ knew how to push.”

For civil rights activist Jesse Jackson, Kennedy’s death was a critical inflection point in the civil rights movement. He remembers walking across campus at North Carolina A&T and hearing it on the radio. “I couldn’t believe it,” he remembered, “Presidents didn’t get killed. Lincoln had been killed, but that was so long ago. I felt like there were two assassinations, Kennedy and civil rights. I would eventually realize that I was wrong.”

Source: Jared Cohen: JFK’s death — THIS is what Condoleezza Rice, Dick Cheney, Jesse Jackson, others will never forget | Fox News

Categories
History Opinion Space

October Full Moon 2019: When is the Hunter’s Moon and what is its meaning? | Science | News | Express.co.uk

OCTOBER’S Full Moon, the Hunter’s Moon, peaks this weekend – but when exactly is the Full Moon and what is the meaning behind its name.

The Old Farmer’s Almanac said: “Some folks believe that this Full Moon was called the Full Hunter’s Moon because it signalled the time to go hunting in preparation for winter.

“Since the harvesters had recently reaped the fields under the Harvest Moon, hunters could easily see the fattened deer and other animals that had come out to glean – and the foxes and wolves that had come out to prey on them.

Source: October Full Moon 2019: When is the Hunter’s Moon and what is its meaning? | Science | News | Express.co.uk

Categories
Entertainment History Movies Opinion Unexplained

Out & About: ‘Kecksburg’ movie makes Westmoreland County premiere | TribLIVE.com

Following its Sept. 12 world premiere in Uniontown, “Kecksburg” finally made its Westmoreland County debut.

Westmoreland Historical Society hosted a Sept. 28 showing of the new movie in the Westmoreland History Education Center at Historic Hanna’s Town.

Director/producer Cody Knotts was on hand to introduce his take on the infamous 1965 UFO incident in the tiny Mt. Pleasant Township hamlet.

Knotts said that neither the Uniontown nor the Hanna’s Town screening represented the movie’s final take.

Source: Out & About: ‘Kecksburg’ movie makes Westmoreland County premiere | TribLIVE.com

Categories
History Medical News Opinion Unexplained

This is what mysterious ancient humans might have looked like – CNN

We know that mysterious ancient humans called Denisovans once lived alongside Neanderthals, thanks to a few bones and teeth recovered from a cave in Siberia. Now, for the first time, researchers have shared what they might have looked like.

Source: This is what mysterious ancient humans might have looked like – CNN

Categories
Health History News Opinion Science

The key to curing the common cold could lurk within our own cells | Popular Science

The team raised mice with inhibited SETD3 genes, and they were able to reach adulthood with no apparent problems—and with a resistance to the common cold.

Sniffle season is here, but so is a potential solution—and we don’t mean chicken soup. Researchers at Stanford University and the University of California San Francisco have identified a specific protein inside human cells that, when disabled, can stop some of the peskiest viruses in their tracks. The researchers hope that their results, published this week in Nature, may pave the way for a new era in the fight against rhinoviruses (collectively known as “the common cold”) and more serious enteroviruses like polio and those that cause brain inflammation or encephalitis.

“Our approach is a little bit different than the regular antiviral approach where you directly target viral proteins,” says study senior author Jan E. Carette, a Stanford University microbiologist. Conventional therapies try to destroy viruses by targeting their proteins, which they need to live. But the pathogens need our proteins, too: they proliferate by injecting their DNA into host cells. Different viruses need different proteins to complete this process.

Source: The key to curing the common cold could lurk within our own cells | Popular Science

Categories
Economy History Jobs News Opinion Technology US

Labor unions are pushing for a four-day workweek – Vox

Americans once worked 100 hours a week, six days in a row. Then, in 1940, came the five-day workweek.

Now labor unions are making the case for even less work: dropping days worked down to four.

That’s one of the changes unions are proposing as part of their vision for the future of work, which is outlined in a report to be released Friday by the AFL-CIO, the largest federation of labor unions in the US. (Disclosure: I am a member of the Writers Guild of America East, which is part of the AFL-CIO.) The report, which was shared in advance with Vox, focuses on finding ways to make sure workers can best benefit from automation and other technological changes.

As technology makes workers more productive, unions argue, why not give them three-day weekends? Not 40 hours compressed into four days. Labor unions are proposing a 32-hour workweek, with employees earning no less than they did before.

Source: Labor unions are pushing for a four-day workweek – Vox

Categories
History Opinion Space

Ancient Mars was warm and rainy enough to support life, study says | Fox News

It’s long been established that Mars once had water on its surface. But a new study suggests that between 3 and 4 billion years ago, the Red Planet was warm and wet enough to have massive rainstorms and flowing water, an environment that may have supported life.

Source: Ancient Mars was warm and rainy enough to support life, study says | Fox News

Categories
Entertainment Food History

Latrobe’s Great American Banana Split Celebration promises a sweet weekend | TribLIVE.com

 

By Candy Williams

A classic ice cream dessert that’s been making people smile since 1904 is once again deserving of an annual summertime salute.

Latrobe serves up its 115th Great American Banana Split Celebration Aug. 23-25.

The banana split was first invented by David Strickler, an apprentice pharmacist at a local drug store.

This is the sixth year of the official celebration and new events have been added, says Isaac McDaniel of Greater Latrobe-Laurel Valley Regional Chamber of Commerce, event director.

Parking will be free in downtown Latrobe throughout the weekend.

Candy Williams is a Tribune-Review contributing writer.

Source: Latrobe’s Great American Banana Split Celebration promises a sweet weekend | TribLIVE.com

2019 Great American Banana Split Celebration
When: Aug. 23-25, vendors and activities open noon-8 p.m. Aug. 23, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Aug. 24 and 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Aug. 25
Admission: Free
Where: Downtown Latrobe
Details: 724-537-2671 or bananasplitfest.com

Categories
Entertainment Food History

Pittsburgh Renaissance Festival takes you on a magical tour through time and legend!

Come and enjoy the Pittsburgh Renaissance Festival! 2019 Festival Dates
August 17-18, 24-25, 31 September 1-2, 7-8, 14-15, 21-22,  2019
Open Saturdays, Sundays, and Labor Day Monday· 10:30 am to 6:30 pm

As you wander down the village streets and pathways of the Pittsburgh Renaissance Festival, ready thyself to revel with master revelers, watch artisans create original works of their ancient craft and be taken in by the tantalizing aromas of roast turkey legges, steak on a stake, fresh baked goods and much more. Featuring a cast of hundreds of authentically costumed merrymakers living and working throughout the village and performing, continuously, upon the Festival’s stages, the illusion of a rollicking 16th Century festival day is created.

Source: Pittsburgh Renaissance Festival takes you on a magical tour through time and legend!

Categories
Celebrities History Legal Opinion

FX is tackling the Clinton-Lewinsky scandal. The timing has raised eyebrows.

“There is nothing that Trump would like more than to turn the homestretch of 2020 into a revisitation of the Clintons,” one prominent critic said.

Bill and Hillary Clinton won’t be on the ballot next November. But with the news that the third season of FX’s “American Crime Story” will chronicle the impeachment of the former president and his affair with Monica Lewinsky, some critics are worried that they could still loom over the 2020 election.

FX, a cable giant known for its provocative programming, announced Tuesday it was moving forward with an adaptation of Jeffrey Toobin’s book “A Vast Conspiracy: The Real Story of the Sex Scandal That Nearly Brought Down a President” — with Lewinsky herself serving as one of the co-producers.

Source: FX is tackling the Clinton-Lewinsky scandal. The timing has raised eyebrows.

Categories
Africa Education History Middle East News Opinion

Tutankhamun’s gilded coffin leaves its tomb for the first time since 1922 | Somerset County Gazette

The gilded outer coffin has been removed from the king’s tomb for the first time since it was discovered in 1922 and it will take eight months to restore weaknesses in the plaster.

Tutankhamun, known as the “Golden Pharaoh”, was an 18th dynasty king who ruled from the age of eight to 19. He died in 1324BC and is best known for being the first royal tomb to be discovered almost entirely intact.

Source: Tutankhamun’s gilded coffin leaves its tomb for the first time since 1922 | Somerset County Gazette

Categories
Comedy Entertainment History Movies Television

Q&A: Lucie Arnaz reflects on ‘I Love Lucy’ as TV sitcom hits big screen | WTOP

Get ready for TV’s most influential sitcom as Fathom Events and CBS Home Entertainment present “I Love Lucy: A Colorized Celebration” in theaters nationwide on Tuesday to mark Lucille Ball’s birthday.

It’s your chance to laugh at colorized versions of the beloved sitcom, starring Ball, Desi Arnaz, Vivian Vance and William Frawley. Attendees will receive an “I Love Lucy” poster.

“It’s never been on the big screen,” Lucie Arnaz, daughter of Ball and Desi Arnaz, told WTOP. “My brother and I don’t own ‘I Love Lucy.’ My mother and father sold that show to CBS back in the ’50s. We share in the merchandising rights, which is fun and God knows put my children through college, but because we’re in a nice partnership with CBS, this is all very celebratory. … Any time you can bring in a new generation to appreciate that show, it’s a good thing.”

Source: Q&A: Lucie Arnaz reflects on ‘I Love Lucy’ as TV sitcom hits big screen | WTOP

Categories
crime History Medical

John Dillinger’s Relatives Say They Have ‘Evidence’ The Buried Body May Not Be His : NPR

“I have been presented with evidence that demonstrates that the individual who was shot and killed … may not in fact have been my uncle,” his nephew, Mike Thompson, said in an affidavit.

Source: John Dillinger’s Relatives Say They Have ‘Evidence’ The Buried Body May Not Be His : NPR

Categories
History Middle East

Secret chamber in King Tut’s tomb could hide Queen Nefertiti | Fox News

One of Egypt’s greatest mysteries could be solved as scientists think they have located the final resting place of the ancient Egyptian queen, Nefertiti.

A team of Egyptologists thinks that the famously beautiful and powerful female monarch could be buried inside a secret chamber within King Tutankhamun’s legendary tomb.

Source: Secret chamber in King Tut’s tomb could hide Queen Nefertiti | Fox News

Categories
History Opinion Politics

When Will Race-Baiting Kamala Harris Acknowledge She Is A Descendent Of A Slave Owner?

A plantation in Saint Ann Parish, Jamaica, by James Hakewill, 1820s

Racism is a double edged sword in this case

Earlier this year, Harris’ father, Donald J. Harris,  reportedly stated:

“My roots go back, within my lifetime, to my paternal grandmother Miss Chrishy (née Christiana Brown, descendant of Hamilton Brown who is on record as plantation and slave owner and founder of Brown’s Town) and to my maternal grandmother Miss Iris (née Iris Finegan, farmer and educator, from Aenon Town and Inverness, ancestry unknown to me). The Harris name comes from my paternal grandfather Joseph Alexander Harris, land-owner and agricultural ‘produce’ exporter (mostly pimento or all-spice), who died in 1939 one year after I was born and is buried in the church yard of the magnificent Anglican Church which Hamilton Brown built in Brown’s Town (and where, as a child, I learned the catechism, was baptized and confirmed, and served as an acolyte).”

If Kamala Harris’ father’s account of their genealogy is to be believed, Harris’ family tree goes back to Hamilton Brown, one of the more well-known slave owners in Jamaica.

But do we really even have to talk about this stuff if she is determined to be a good President Of The United States?

Source: When Will Race-Baiting Kamala Harris Acknowledge She Is A Descendent Of A Slave Owner?

Categories
Health History Home And Garden Opinion

Why Are People Homeless? 

The National Law Center on Homelessness & Poverty currently estimates that each year at least 2.5 to 3.5 million Americans sleep in shelters, transitional housing, and public places not meant for human
habitation. At least an additional 7.4 million have lost their own homes and are doubled-up with others due to economic necessity.

But data related to homelessness are far from exact. Part of the difficulty is that there are different definitions of homelessness now in use. For example, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban
development (HUD) uses a narrow definition largely limited to people living in shelters, in transitional housing and in public places.

Homeless family sleeping in the streets of KolkataIndia (top); a homeless man in ParisFrance (bottom)

The U.S. Department of Education (DoE) uses a broader definition that
includes families who are doubled-up with others due to economic necessity. Another difficulty concerns methodology. HUD reports annual “Point-in-Time” counts of the “unsheltered” homeless population; however, the methodology used to collect those numbers varies by community and is often deeply flawed.2 HUD also reports annual counts of the sheltered population; this number varies with shelter apacity, which depends on variables such as available funding.

Source: Greensburg Pennsylvania Homeless Shelter List

Sourc:e: https://nlchp.org/

Categories
History News Opinion Weather World

Hello, Summer! Today’s Solstice Marks Season’s Beginning | Space

Summer will officially arrive in the Northern Hemisphere today (June 21), marking the longest day, the shortest night and the beginning of summer.

The June solstice will occur at 11:54 a.m. EDT (1554 GMT), as the sun reaches the point at which it is farthest north of the celestial equator. To be more precise, when the solstice occurs, the sun will appear to shine directly overhead for a viewer stationed on the Tropic of Cancer (latitude 23.5 degrees north) in the western Atlantic Ocean, roughly 600 miles (965 kilometers) to the northwest of San Juan, Puerto Rico.

From midnorthern latitudes, we can never see the sun directly overhead, but the same principle holds. For example, as seen from Philadelphia at 1:02 p.m. EDT on solstice day, the sun will attain its highest point in the sky for this entire year, standing 74 degrees above the southern horizon.

To gauge how high that is, your clenched fist held at arm’s length measures roughly 10 degrees, so from the City of Brotherly Love, the sun will appear to climb more than “seven fists” above the southern horizon. And since the sun will appear to describe such a high arc across the sky, daylight will be at its longest extreme, lasting 15 hours and 1 minute.

Related: The Brightest Visible Planets in June’s Night Sky: How to See Them (and When)

Source: Hello, Summer! Today’s Solstice Marks Season’s Beginning | Space