Brett Kavanaugh: First SCOTUS cases to include guns and immigration

WASHINGTON – Brett Kavanaugh will be on the Supreme Court in time to hear cases on immigration, product liability and the Armed Career Criminal Act.

Kavanaugh was sworn in Saturday by Chief Justice John Roberts and former associate justice Anthony Kennedy, for whom he clerked a quarter century ago. A White House ceremony will be held Monday, and the 53-year-old judge will take a seat on the far right side of the bench Tuesday, next to Associate Justice Elena Kagan, who hired him to teach at Harvard Law School when she was dean.

Although he will give the court its first reliable conservative majority in decades, the docket facing the justices in the term that began Monday isn’t filled with the types of major cases that produce 5-4 rulings.

Today at the Court – Wednesday, Oct 10, 2018


  • The Supreme Court Building is open to the public from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
  • The Court will convene for a public session in the Courtroom at 10 a.m. The Justices will hear two, one-hour oral arguments.
  • Courtroom Lectures available within the next 30 days.

Source: Brett Kavanaugh: First SCOTUS cases to include guns and immigration

After Kavanaugh confirmation, Pelosi vows to unearth FBI docs as Dems demand impeachment inquiry | Fox News

Before and immediately after the Senate narrowly voted to confirm Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court on Saturday, top Democrats vowed that they would continue to fight — not only at the ballot box in November’s midterm elections, but also through further investigations and potentially even impeachment proceedings afterwards.

On Saturday, House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi announced she planned to file a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request to obtain documents related to the FBI’s supplemental probe of Kavanaugh, which senators said showed no corroboration of the decades-old sexual misconduct allegations against him. FBI background checks on judicial nominees have traditionally been kept confidential so that only senators, White House officials, and certain aides can view them.

Source: After Kavanaugh confirmation, Pelosi vows to unearth FBI docs as Dems demand impeachment inquiry | Fox News

Brett Kavanaugh confirmation: Victory for Trump in Supreme Court battle – BBC News

President Donald Trump’s controversial nominee for the Supreme Court, Brett Kavanaugh, has been sworn in following weeks of rancorous debate.

The Senate earlier backed his nomination by 50 votes to 48.

Mr Kavanaugh had been embroiled in a bitter battle to stave off claims of sexual assault, which he denies.

But after an 11th-hour investigation by the FBI into the allegations, enough wavering senators decided to support the nomination.

His confirmation hands Mr Trump a political victory ahead of key mid-term elections in November.

Source: Brett Kavanaugh confirmation: Victory for Trump in Supreme Court battle – BBC News

$3 million raised for Susan Collins’ 2020 challenger after she backed Brett Kavanaugh – ThinkProgress

Whoever runs against Sen. Susan Collins (R-ME) in 2020 will start off their campaign with nearly $3 million, thanks to a crowdfunding campaign opposing Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh.

Already, two politicians have expressed interest in running: U.S. National Security Advisor for the Obama administration Susan Rice and Speaker of the Maine House of Representatives Sara Gideon. On Twitter, both hinted they’d be interested in opposing Collins in 2020. Now either one could start with millions in her war chest.

Source: $3 million raised for Susan Collins’ 2020 challenger after she backed Brett Kavanaugh – ThinkProgress

Opinion | How Brett Kavanaugh Failed – The New York Times

In this crucible of power politics, of bullying and posturing and rage, no one has been more severely tested than Judge Kavanaugh. If he believes himself innocent of sexual assault — if he is innocent of sexual assault — the test, to him, can only appear monstrous.

Yet unfair as the test might seem to the judge and his supporters, senators who want to preserve the credibility of the Supreme Court cannot now look away from the result: Judge Kavanaugh failed, decisively.

How? First, he gave misleading answers under oath. Judges — particularly Supreme Court justices — must have, and be seen as having, unimpeachable integrity. The knuckleheaded mistakes of a young person — drinking too much, writing offensive things in a high school yearbook — should not in themselves be bars to high office. But deliberately misleading senators about them during a confirmation process has to be. If Judge Kavanaugh will lie about small things, won’t he lie about big ones as well?

Indeed he already has: During the course of his confirmation hearings, he claimed, implausibly, that he was not aware that files he received from a Senate staff member, some labeled “highly confidential” or “intel,” had been stolen from Democratic computers.

Even the small lies, of course, aren’t so small in context, since they relate to drinking or sex and thus prop up his choir-boy-who-indulged-now-and-then defense.

Read Full Story From Source: Opinion | How Brett Kavanaugh Failed – The New York Times

Brett Kavanaugh: Key test vote on Supreme Court nominee passes – BBC News

President Trump’s nominee Brett Kavanaugh wins a key vote despite facing sexual assault claims he denies.

The US Senate has narrowly advanced President Donald Trump’s Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh’s nomination to a final vote.

Friday’s vote – 51-49 in favour – was a test of support for the embattled nominee who has faced sexual assault allegations from several women.

All eyes are on several swing senators for Saturday’s final vote.

Judge Kavanaugh’s confirmation would tilt America’s highest court in favour of conservatives.

The nine-member panel has the final say on issues such as abortion, gun control and voting rules and justices are appointed for life.

Source: Brett Kavanaugh: Key test vote on Supreme Court nominee passes – BBC News

The FBI confidential Kavanaugh report: Who’s allowed to read it and where

All 100 senators will have secure access to the new information on Thursday, but not their staffs. They have set a pecking order for who gets to see it first.

WASHINGTON — The much-awaited FBI’s supplemental background investigation was delivered overnight to Capitol Hill and lawmakers will start reading it on Thursday morning.

It consists of the “302” forms of the FBI interviews, which summarize the contents of the interviews, according to aides and senators. The FBI, which has spent only a few days on the investigation, did not submit a conclusion as to who’s telling the truth in the case.

Source: The FBI confidential Kavanaugh report: Who’s allowed to read it and where

Kavanaugh won’t return to teach at Harvard Law School next semester | TheHill

Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh will not return to Harvard Law School to teach a course that he was previously scheduled to teach in the winter 2019 term.

Harvard Associate Dean Catherine Claypoole wrote in an email to Harvard Law students on Monday evening that the school will not offer the course because Kavanaugh can “no longer commit” to teaching it.

Source: Kavanaugh won’t return to teach at Harvard Law School next semester | TheHill