Coronavirus: French police seize 140,000 black market masks – BBC News

French police say they have seized 140,000 face masks destined for sale on the black market.

Officers say they caught a businessman unloading the masks from a lorry into a house in St Denis, north of Paris.

Last month, France requisitioned all stocks and production of face masks to equip health workers.

Meanwhile in China, the authorities have confiscated 89m poor quality face masks. The country has faced criticism over poor quality exports.

Officials had inspected nearly 16 million businesses and had also seized large quantities of ineffective disinfectant, government official Gan Lin said.

And in Germany, medical wholesalers say they have almost run out of masks. From Monday it will be compulsory for people to cover their faces in shops and on public transport in the country.

Source: Coronavirus: French police seize 140,000 black market masks – BBC News

14 new cases, no new deaths reported in Westmoreland County | TribLIVE.com

Westmoreland County saw 14 new cases of covid-19 as of Sunday, but no new deaths related to the virus, data provided by state and local officials show.

The county’s total number of covid-19 cases reached 374 on Sunday, up from the 360 cases reported on Saturday.

The death total reported by state officials remained at 19. That number remains lower than the 27 covid-19 deaths reported by Westmoreland County Coroner Ken Bacha.

According to state numbers, roughly 41% of Westmoreland’s covid-19 cases, as well as all deaths reported by the state, can be attributed to nursing and personal care homes.

As of Sunday, 19 nursing home deaths had been reported, and 125 residents and 28 employees across six different facilities had tested positive for the virus in the county, state data show.

The coroner hasn’t added to the county’s death toll since Thursday.

Source: 14 new cases, no new deaths reported in Westmoreland County | TribLIVE.com

Farms to destroy 2M chickens due to plant staffing shortages | WBFF

Coronavirus-related staffing shortages at chicken processing plants will lead farms in Maryland and Delaware to destroy nearly 2 million chickens. The Baltimore Sun reported Friday that the plants are unable to keep pace with the number of birds that are ready for harvest. They had been placed into poultry houses as chicks several weeks ago. The chickens will not be processed for meat.

Source: Farms to destroy 2M chickens due to plant staffing shortages | WBFF

Is Bill Gates Really the Great Guy You Think He Is?

Bill Gates has emerged through the coronavirus rubble as a prophet and savior, but is he even a good person?

Is it possible to be a bad man when you give billions of dollars in charity? Let’s take a deeper look at the enigma that is Bill Gates.

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Bill Gates has taken on the aura of a prophet since the coronavirus pandemic began. It seemed like he warned of this exact problem years before it happened. He and Melinda pledged to donate a whopping $100 million to coronavirus relief efforts.

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He’s also generally acted as a guru to guide us through this time.

Bill Gates gives away massive amounts of money, he lifts the downtrodden, and he works diligently to treat and cure disease. What’s not to like? More than you might think.

The Case Against Bill Gates

While his charitable donations are undeniable, Bill Gates has some red flags hiding in those deep pockets.

First, those vaccines that he so generously helps develop are shrouded in controversy.

The BMGF, and several partners, have been accused of testing these vaccines on people in third-world and lightly-regulated countries. These experiments have allegedly been given without consent and resulted in deaths.

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Right-wing provocateur Candace Owens takes a shot at Bill Gates. | Source: Twitter

One report from Golden University School of Law notes:

All of these programs resulted in numerous deaths and injuries

Source: Is Bill Gates Really the Great Guy You Think He Is?

Small businesses say they need more than 2 months of help to survive coronavirus crisis

Strict restrictions on federal assistance could hinder their bid for long-term survival.

The latest version of the Paycheck Protection Program, or PPP, is expected to provide $310 billion more to help limit the economic meltdown caused by the coronavirus pandemic.

But for the federally backed loans to be forgiven, recipients must spend 75 percent of the money within eight weeks on payroll to employees who were on the books as the pandemic broke out. The remaining money can be spent on rent, utilities, employee health care benefits and mortgage payments.

Nicole Marquis, owner of the restaurant HipCityVeg in Philadelphia, a recipient of the most recent round of federal aid, said future packages must “provide flexibility in timing to use it.”

She said that while the federal government appears to believe businesses will be up and running in two months, that’s not the reality she sees.

Source: Small businesses say they need more than 2 months of help to survive coronavirus crisis

Spain lets children outside after 44 days in coronavirus lockdown, sees lowest daily deaths in more than month

Scooters, bicycles and skateboards returned to the streets of Spain on Sunday as children stepped outside for the first time in 44 days since living in home confinement under one of Europe’s strictest coronavirus lockdowns.

Spain’s government let children under 14 years old leave their homes for one hour of supervised activity per day, but they must stay within 1 kilometer, or about half a mile, of their home. This brief freedom comes as the hard-hit nation reported its lowest daily death count in over a month.

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“This is wonderful! I can’t believe it has been six weeks,” said Susana Sabaté, a mother of 3-year-old twin boys who were wearing child-size face-masks. “My boys are very active. Today when they saw the front door and we gave them their scooters, they were thrilled.”

Source: Spain lets children outside after 44 days in coronavirus lockdown, sees lowest daily deaths in more than month

Roofing business cited for non-essential business violation | fox43.com

 The owner, seven employees, and a hired trainer, were all within close proximity and no one was wearing PPE. The day before, multiple employees complained to the owner that they were concerned for their health at a training session the day before. Middle Creek Roofing was previously warned about compliance by State Police on April 20 and then by Millcreek Township Police on April 22.

Source: Roofing business cited for non-essential business violation | fox43.com

SWAT Called to Assist After Suspects Refuse To Exit a House  —  Public Safety Media Blotter

Date: April 26, 2020
Incident Type: SWAT
Location: Zone 5
Summary:

Pittsburgh Police responded to multiple Shotspotter alerts for the vicinity of Lincoln Avenue & Lyric Street around 12:20 a.m.

Responding Zone 5 officers came upon an idling vehicle at the intersection of Laxton Street & Odessa Place. Immediately upon seeing the officers, the driver and passenger fled the vehicle. At least one of the suspects was observed by officers running into a nearby house on the 6700 block of Deary Street. He refused to come out when instructed by officers. With the assistance of SWAT and negotiators, the two individuals were taken into custody without incident following a brief standoff. There were no reported injuries or shooting victims found.

Police are investigating.


Reporting PIO: 
Maurice Matthews

2020-04-26
PIO@pittsburghpa.gov

Source: Public Safety Media Blotter

How Pittsburgh’s polio vaccine triumph could shape race to end coronavirus pandemic | TribLIVE.com

Sunday marks the 66th anniversary to the day when the first inoculations began on nearly 2 million children who received Salk’s vaccine candidate in 1954. By 1955, the pivotal public health experiment was deemed a success, with the vaccine proving to be safe, potent and 90% effective in thwarting polio.

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The achievement put Pittsburgh on the global map as a leader in cutting-edge medical research and set the stage for decades of investments and advancements in Pitt’s vaccine research capabilities. As the nation confronts the covid-19 pandemic, Pittsburgh scientists have joined the global race to stop the spread of yet another disease horrifying the world.2579737_web1_ptr-raceforvaccine-042620

“Pittsburgh has such a tremendous track record in infectious disease research. There are people working on influenza, there are people working on viruses that cause cancer, there are people who work on HIV. There’s a phenomenal cohort of people in the University of Pittsburgh — and that’s what attracted me,” said Paul Duprex, a virologist who took the helm last year as director of Pitt’s Center for Vaccine Research.

Source: How Pittsburgh’s polio vaccine triumph could shape race to end coronavirus pandemic | TribLIVE.com