(CRN) – Dell Latitude 12 Rugged Tablet Launches Into ‘Big Niche’ Among Police, Factories, ‘Adventurers’

 

Dell on Tuesday launched its first fully rugged tablet designed for field workers, first responders, the military and other users who take their technology into situations where it may fall, be dropped or get wet and dirty.

Originally targeted for launch late in the second quarter, the Windows-based Dell Latitude 12 tablet joins the rest of the rugged Latitude line, which includes 12- and 14-inch fully rugged notebooks, and it comes at a time when certain customers are looking for rugged products, but adoption hasn’t been particularly strong.

The Latitude 12 tablet starts at $1,599.

[Related: Dell Intros TLC 3D NAND Flash, Brings All-Flash SC4020 To $1.66/GB Raw]

Stephen Monteros, vice president of business development and strategy at Ontario, Calif.-based Sigmanet, a Dell partner, said the Latitude 12 tablet is a good match for the channel.

In the past, rugged products have been cumbersome and hard to work with, Monteros said. But they’ve come a long way and Monteros sees increased demand on the horizon, especially for technology integrators that work with the public sector, specifically police departments and other first responders.

“It’s a niche product, but it’s a big niche,” Monteros told CRN. Police departments, especially, “are looking to put more of this stuff out there, and this makes it easier to do that,” he said.

Monteros also said Dell is introducing the Latitude 12 tablet at the right moment. “Dell, when they think something’s mature and dialed in, they’ll capitalize on it immediately. Panasonic is one of the leaders (in rugged products), but it hasn’t seen widespread adoption, so this product is coming out at the right time.”

The Latitude 12 tablet includes fourth-generation QuadCool thermal management technology to help it cope with severe temperatures. It runs on fifth-generation Intel Core M processors and boasts up to 12 hours of battery life with two 2-cell batteries.

The tablet comes with solid-state storage up to 512 GB, 802.11ac Wi-Fi, optional broadband and dedicated GPS. It is secured with Dell Data Protection, available Intel vPro and Intel TPM 1.2.

The tablet has a docking interface for component expansion, a variety of compatible attachments and docks for desks and vehicles, and an optional full-size keyboard.

The Dell Latitude 12 tablet joins the rest of the rugged Latitude line, which includes 12- and 14-inch fully rugged notebooks.
Read Source: Dell Latitude 12 Rugged Tablet Launches Into ‘Big Niche’ Among Police, Factories, ‘Adventurers’ – CRN

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(CNN.com) – NASA’s New Horizons probe makes history at Pluto

NASA says its New Horizons spacecraft completed a historic flyby of Pluto, making its closest pass at 7:49 a.m. ET. Tuesday.

Pluto’s mysterious heart seen in this NASA Photo (CNN)

(CNN)NASA says its New Horizons spacecraft completed a historic flyby of Pluto on Tuesday, making its closest pass over the small, icy world at 7:49 a.m. ET.

The unmanned, piano-sized spacecraft was expected to be traveling nearly 31,000 miles per hour when it passed about 7,750 miles over Pluto.

It’s the first mission to Pluto and its five moons.

Because the spacecraft will be busy gathering data during the flyby, it won’t phone home to update its status until around 9 p.m. ET on Tuesday.

“That’s going to be a very highly anticipated event,” Alan Stern, the mission’s principal investigator said at a briefing Monday.

The wait will be a tense one.

“There’s that small element of danger, so I think we’re all going to breathe the final sigh of relief at 9 p.m., and that’s when we can really call it a successful flyby,” Stern said.

Quiz: Test your knowledge of Pluto
When will you see photos from the flyby? It takes four hours for the probe to get a signal back to Earth, and then NASA has to process the data. Mission managers expect the images from the close encounter to be released online and on NASA TV at 3 p.m. ET on Wednesday.

Scientists on Monday said New Horizons already has settled one debate about Pluto — it’s size. Information gathered by the probe indicates Pluto is 1,473 miles (2,370 kilometers) in diameter. That’s somewhat bigger than earlier estimates, and it means Pluto is larger than all other known solar system objects beyond the orbit of Neptune.

Probe is carrying ashes of man who discovered Pluto
The probe already has beamed back several crisp photos of Pluto and its largest moon, Charon.

“Pluto and Charon are both mind-blowing,” Stern told CNN on Saturday. “I think that the biggest surprise is the complexity we’re seeing in both objects.”

The mission completes what NASA calls the reconnaissance of the classical solar system, and it makes the United States the first nation to send a space probe to every planet from Mercury to Pluto. The probe traveled more than 3 billion miles to reach Pluto.

12 things to know about Pluto

Why go to Pluto?
New Horizon’s core science mission is to map the surfaces of Pluto and Charon. It also will study their atmosphere.

The spacecraft was launched on January 19, 2006, before the big debate started over Pluto’s status as a planet. In August of that year, the International Astronomical Union reclassified Pluto as a dwarf planet.
But Stern disagrees with the IAU’s decision.

“We’re just learning that a lot of planets are small planets, and we didn’t know that before,” Stern said earlier. “Fact is, in planetary science, objects such as Pluto and the other dwarf planets in the Kuiper Belt are considered planets and called planets in everyday discourse in scientific meetings.”

New Horizons has seven instruments on board to help scientists better understand how Pluto and its moons fit in with the rest of the planets in our solar system.

The planets closest to our sun — Mercury, Venus, Earth and Mars — are rocky. Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune are gas giants. But Pluto is different: Even though it is out beyond the gas giants, it has a solid, icy surface.

Beyond Pluto
New Horizons looks like a gold foil-covered grand piano. It’s is 27 inches (0.7 meters) tall, 83 inches (2.1 meters) long and 108 inches (2.7 meters) wide. It weighed 1,054 pounds (478 kilograms) at launch.

The probe won’t orbit Pluto and it won’t land. Instead, it will keep flying, heading deeper into the Kuiper Belt, a region that scientists think is filled with hundreds of small, icy objects.

“The universe has a lot more variety than we thought about, and that’s wonderful,” Stern said. “The most exciting discoveries will likely be the ones we don’t anticipate.”

Stern said mission managers will decide later this year where to point New Horizons for the next part of its journey.

NASA’s New Horizons probe makes history at Pluto – CNN.com” target=”_blank”>Read More

(STGIST) – Auto companies not giving Google and Apple “all the data” from smart vehicles –

Car companies are looking to create their own data business, so they’re planning to limit the data they share with tech giants Apple Inc., and Google.

 

Citing a single reason, key players in the automobile industry have toldReuters that they will limit the data that they share with tech partners Apple Inc., and Google Inc.

Car companies Ford, GM and Volkswagen AG’s Audi subsidiary, are reportedly hoping that one day, they will create a new revenue stream from data provided by phone-compatible vehicles. A data business, so to speak.

According to the report, car manufacturers hope that the data from car dashboards will generate billions of dollars — like how Amazon uses its internal algorithm to understand how consumers behave while buying stuff online.

In case you’re wondering, car companies are now collecting data from drivers by selling cars that can communicate with electronics, including smartphones and tablet computers. Consumers use these systems to play music, get access to mapping data, and others. Apple and Google provide the operating system compatibility via the Android and iOS. Consumers can access the apps and other content on the smartphone by using the car dashboard with built-in display.

Don Butler, an executive director at Ford Motors, has told Reuters that they’re limiting the data they share with the tech giants in California because they’re protecting their company’s “ability to create value.” The same article also revealed that General Motors Corp has told its investors that a whopping $350 million additional revenue (over the next three years) would come in from the smarter car dashboards.

Not Surprisingly

At Fortune, Stacey Higginbotham wrote that this decision “surprises no one.” She then explained how car companies could fail.

Meanwhile on other parts of the world-wide web, followers of news linked to Apple and Google have suggested that the auto industry’s action against the two tech giants may be connected to reports about the still unconfirmed Apple automobile, in addition to the highly publicized Google driverless car technology program.

At Bloomberg, Craig Trudell has underlined the fact that Google and Apple are not yet into manufacturing of cars, but both are already paving the way to reach the lucrative four-wheel industry.

Apparently, Google has been making significant progress on self-driving car technology, so much so that the prototype car will start running beyond its test tracks.

Last month, Google’s prototype self-driving cars hit the public streets around Mountain View, California for the first time. Also in June, the search giant confirmed that its cars will soon invade the highways on the state of Virginia.

Source: Auto companies not giving Google and Apple “all the data” from smart vehicles – STGIST