(artvoice.com) – Reverse Engineering Ahmed Mohamed’s Clock… and Ourselves.

header

I have something in common with Ahmed Mohamed: as a youngster, I was also an electronics enthusiast. At his age and even earlier, I frequently took apart electronic devices – anything from my own toys, to broken things around the house, and even that dirty garbage-picked black and white TV my parents dragged home that they knew I’d have a blast playing with (I did.) I’d try and troubleshoot, repair, or sometimes just disassemble things and salvage components for future projects. I’d try and imagine how all those bits and pieces, lengths of wires, mazes of conductive circuit board traces all came together to produce an image, or a sound, or some other useful function. I wanted to know how it all worked.

Without dating myself – fast forward a bunch of years, and I’m the same way. I’ve even picked up an engineering degree over the course of those years. I don’t have to only imagine how things work anymore, I have a pretty good understanding now. When shopping for electronic devices, my first instinct is to see if there’s a way to build one myself (and, I frequently do!) When something of mine breaks, I don’t send it back, I take it as a personal challenge to get it working again. If I fail, I still salvage useful parts – they might come in handy to fix something else later. This aspect of myself – being both methodical, and curious – hasn’t changed a bit over the years.

High resolution police photo of Ahmed's clock. Click to enlarge.

So, this story about a 14 year old boy in Texas that was arrested on suspicion of creating a bomb hoax (who, apparently just wanted to show off his latest electronics project to his teachers) that has blown up (no pun intended) all over the news and social media, caught my attention immediately. Not because of his race, or his religion, the seeming absurdity of the situation, the emotionally charged photo of a young boy in a NASA t-shirt being led off in hand cuffs, the hash tags, the presidential response… no, none of that. I’m an electronics geek. I was interested in the clock! I wanted to figure out what he had come up with.

I found the highest resolution photograph of the clock I could. Instantly, I was disappointed. Somewhere in all of this – there has indeed been a hoax. Ahmed Mohamed didn’t invent his own alarm clock. He didn’t even build a clock. Now, before I go on and get accused of attacking a 14 year old kid who’s already been through enough, let me explain my purpose. I don’t want to just dissect the clock. I want to dissect our reaction as a society to the situation. Part of that is the knee-jerk responses we’re all so quick to make without facts. So, before you scroll down and leave me angry comments, please continue to the end (or not – prove my point, and miss the point, entirely!)

For starters, one glance at the printed circuit board in the photo, and I knew we were looking at mid-to-late 1970s vintage electronics. Surely you’ve seen a modern circuit board, with metallic traces leading all over to the various components like an electronic spider’s web. You’ll notice right away the highly accurate spacing, straightness of the lines, consistency of the patterns. That’s because we design things on computers nowadays, and computers assist in routing these lines. Take a look at the board in Ahmed’s clock. It almost looks hand-drawn, right? That’s because it probably was. Computer aided design was in its infancy in the 70s. This is how simple, low cost items (like an alarm clock) were designed. Today, even a budding beginner is going to get some computer aided assistance – in fact they’ll probably start there, learning by simulating designs before building them. You can even simulate or lay out a board with free apps on your phone or tablet. A modern hobbyist usually wouldn’t be bothered with the outdated design techniques. There’s also silk screening on the board. An “M” logo, “C-94” (probably, a part number – C might even stand for “clock”), and what looks like an American flag. More about that in a minute. Point for now being, a hobbyist wouldn’t silk screen logos and part numbers on their home made creation. It’s pretty safe to say already we’re looking at ’70s tech, mass produced in a factory.

So I turned to eBay, searching for vintage alarm clocks. It only took a minute to locate Ahmed’s clock. See this eBay listing, up at the time of this writing. Amhed’s clock was invented, and built, by Micronta, a Radio Shack subsidary. Catalog number 63 765.

Image property of eBay seller curiosities_curios

The shape and design is a dead give away. The large screen. The buttons on the front laid out horizontally would have been on a separate board – a large snooze button, four control buttons, and two switches to turn the alarm on and off, and choose two brightness levels. A second board inside would have contained the actual “brains” of the unit. The clock features a 9v battery back-up, and a switch on the rear allows the owner to choose between 12 and 24 hour time. (Features like a battery back-up, and a 24 hour time selection seems awful superfluous for a hobby project, don’t you think?) Oh, and about that “M” logo on the circuit board mentioned above? Micronta.

clock5

clock6For one last bit of confirmation, I located the pencil box Ahmed used for his project. During this video interview he again claims it was his “invention” and that he “made” the device – but the important thing at the moment, at 1:13, we see him showing the pencil box on his computer screen. Here it is on Amazon, where it’s clearly labeled as being 8.25 inches wide. Our eBay seller also conveniently took a photo of the clock next to a ruler to show it’s scale – about 8 inches wide. The dimensions all line up perfectly.

So there you have it folks, Ahmed Mohamed did not invent, nor build a clock. He took apart an existing clock, and transplanted the guts into a pencil box, and claimed it was his own creation. It all seems really fishy to me.

If we accept the story about “inventing” an alarm clock is made up, as I think I’ve made a pretty good case for, it’s fair to wonder what other parts of the story might be made up, not reported factually by the media, or at least, exaggerated.

I refer back again to this YouTube video interview with Ahmed. He explains that he closed up the box with a piece of cord because he didn’t want it to look suspicious. I’m curious, why would “looking suspicious” have even crossed his mind before this whole event unfolded, if he was truly showing off a hobby project, something so innocuous as an alarm clock. Why did he choose a pencil box, one that looks like a miniature briefcase no less, as an enclosure for a clock? It’s awful hard to see the clock with the case closed. On the other hand, with the case open, it’s awful dangerous to have an exposed power transformer sitting near the snooze button (unless, perhaps his invention was to stop serial-snooze-button pressers by giving them a dangerous electrical shock!)

So again, I’m pointing all this out – about the specifics of the clock – not to pick on the poor kid. I’m picking on us, our culture, and our media. I don’t even care about the clock itself at this point.

If we stop and think – was it really such a ridiculous reaction from the teacher and the police in the first place? How many school shootings and incidents of violence have we had, where we hear afterwards “this could have been prevented, if only we paid more attention to the signs!” Teachers are taught to be suspicious and vigilant. Ahmed wasn’t accused of making a bomb – he was accused of making a look-alike, a hoax. And be honest with yourself, a big red digital display with a bunch of loose wires in a brief-case looking box is awful like a Hollywood-style representation of a bomb. Everyone jumped to play the race and religion cards and try and paint the teachers and police as idiots and bigots, but in my mind, they were probably acting responsibly and erring on the side of caution to protect the rest of their students, just in case. “This wouldn’t have happened if Ahmed were white,” they say. We’re supposed to be sensitive to school violence, but apparently religious and racial sensitivity trumps that. At least we have another clue about how the sensitivity and moral outrage pecking order lies.

Because, is it possible, that maybe, just maybe, this was actually a hoax bomb? A silly prank that was taken the wrong way? That the media then ran with, and everyone else got carried away? Maybe there wasn’t even any racial or religious bias on the parts of the teachers and police.

I don’t know any of these things. But I’m intellectually mature enough to admit I don’t know, and to also be OK with that. I don’t feel a need to take the first exit to conclusionville. But I do like to find facts where I can, and prefer to let them lead me to conclusions, rather than a knee jerk judgement based on a headline or sound bite.

I think the whole event – and our collective response, with everybody up to the President chiming in, says a whole lot about us. We don’t care that none of us were there and knows what happened, we jump to conclusions and assume we’re experts. We care about the story, but we don’t care about the actual facts. Headlines and click-bait are far more interesting than thinking for ourselves. We like to point out other any bit of perceived injustice or discrimination we can find – it’s practically a new national past-time. We like playing victim, and we like talking about victims – so much so we sometimes find victims where none really existed. We also like to find somebody to blame, even when there’s nobody at fault. We like to play social justice warrior on our Facebooks and Twitters, posting memes and headlines without digging in behind the sensationalism, winning bonus sensitivity points in the forms of likes and re-tweets. Once group-think kicks in, we rally around hash tags and start shouting moral outrage in a deafeningly loud national chorus. The media plays us like a fiddle, and we don’t even notice we’ve all been had.

As for me, I’m glad to apply the lessons I’ve learned as an electronics enthusiast to other aspects of life. There’s no emotion in troubleshooting a circuit, electricity doesn’t have morals. There’s just physics, and logic, and methodology. I think we could all benefit from applying a little more of that sort of thinking to these situations.

* Correction: A reader and commenter, Joe Donaldson, tracked down the clock in a Radio Shack catalog dated 1986. It’s likely that my guess of mid-to-late 70s was off by a bit, and it’s now obvious it was a model that was for sale in the mid 80s. Though it doesn’t really change the point, I want to post this correction here for accuracy sake and thank Joe for the heads up. (See the comment here, with link to the catalog page.)

(TIME) – Russia Has Added Dozens of Aircraft to Its Growing Military Presence in Syria: Reports

Vladimir Putin has reportedly added drones, attack helicopters and aircraft to its force in Syria in recent weeks

Russia rapidly increased its aerial attack capabilities in Syria over the weekend, U.S. officials told Agence France-Presse on Monday, including 28 combat planes that have been sighted at a new Russian air base in the Syrian province of Latakia.

The fleet includes 12 SU-24 attack aircraft, 12 SU-25 ground attack aircraft and four Flanker fighter jets, the officials told the news agency on condition of anonymity. An influx of new weaponry was also reported separately by the New York Times and CNN.

One of the officials told AFP of the additional presence of around 20 combat helicopters and said Russian forces are flying surveillance drones over the Middle Eastern nation’s airspace.

According to the Times, Russia’s military presence in Syria also includes at least three surface-to-air missiles, nine tanks and around 500 marines.

“The equipment and personnel just keep flowing in,” another official told the Times. “They were very busy over the weekend.”

Reports of the new aircraft emerged soon after U.S. Secretary of Defense Ashton Carter held talks with his Russian counterpart Sergei Shoigu on Friday. They discussed concerns that the two forces might inadvertently clash with each other as a U.S.-led coalition continues its air strikes against the Islamic State of Iraq and Greater Syria (ISIS) militant group.

The U.S. and other Western powers fundamentally differ with Moscow on the role of Syria’s President Bashar Assad, believing he must step down in order for his country to emerge from civil war. Russia, on the other hand, is one of the Assad regime’s most prominent allies and has defended its military assistance to the Syrian army.

U.S. State Department spokesperson John Kirby said during a press briefing on Monday that he was “not in a position to independently verify” the reports of Russian aircraft and drones.

“If Russia looks to play a constructive role against [ISIS], that’s one thing, but if what they’re doing is, in fact, propping up the Assad regime, then that’s an entirely different issue altogether,” Kirby added, “because it is the Assad regime that has been a magnet for extremists inside Syria.”

Read More

(variety) – Jack Larson, Jimmy Olsen on ‘Adventures Of Superman’ TV Show, Dies at 87

Jack Larson dead Superman

COURTESY OF ABC

Jack Larson, best know for his role as reporter Jimmy Olsen on the first Superman TV show, died Sunday at his home in Brentwood, Calif. He was 87.

Larson played George Reeves’ (Clark Kent/Superman) wide-eyed coworker at The Daily Planet — a role he tried, in vain, to escape throughout his career — on “Adventures of Superman” in the 1950s.

Larson appeared on “Superman” for six seasons, beginning in 1951. The series came to a close following Reeves’ sudden death in 1959.

Larson was also a playwright; his works include 1966’s “The Candied House,” based on “Hansel and Gretel”; “Cherry, Larry, Sandy, Doris, Jean, Paul,” a comedy about being gay; 1968’s “Chuck”; and 1998’s “The Astronaut’s Tale.” Larson wrote librettos for operas, such as Virgil Thomson’s “Lord Byron.”

He produced several films written and/or directed by his longtime partner, James Bridges, who he met on the set of Ethel Barrymore’s final film, “Johnny Trouble,” in 1957. Larson produced “The Baby Maker” (1970), “Mike’s Murder” (1984) and “Perfect” (1985), among Bridges’ other movies, through their production company.

Larson also appeared in the 1991 series “Superboy” as “Old Jimmy Olsen” (an older version of Justin Whalin’s character), in an episode of ABC’s “Lois & Clark: The New Adventures of Superman” and Bryan Singer’s “Superman Returns” in 2006.

FILED UNDER:

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pPwgG2wNn3Y

 

read more

(foxreno.com) – 28 years for salmonella: Peanut exec gets groundbreaking sentence

28 years for salmonella: Peanut exec gets groundbreaking sentence story image

(CNN) — Stewart Parnell once boasted processing the “finest” peanut products, but on Monday, the former company executive was effectively sentenced to life behind bars for knowingly shipping out deadly food.

A federal judge handed Parnell a 28-year prison sentence, the toughest penalty ever for a corporate executive in a food poisoning outbreak. Parnell is 61 and unless he wins an appeal, he will have to serve out most of his term.

His brother and food broker Michael Parnell received a 20-year sentence, and the plant’s quality assurance manager, Mary Wilkerson, was given five years.

A jury in south Georgia convicted Stewart Parnell a year ago on 72 counts of fraud, conspiracy and the introduction of adulterated food into interstate commerce. The former CEO of the now-defunct Peanut Corporation of America (PCA) was sentenced Monday at the same federal court in Albany, not far from the city of Blakely where his peanut processing plant once profited.

Parnell’s trial was groundbreaking: Never before had a corporate executive been convicted of federal felony charges related to food poisoning. Parnell was facing up to 803 years in prison, and even though his sentence fell far short of the maximum, food safety advocates hailed it as a big step forward.

“Honestly, I think the fact that he was prosecuted at all is a victory for consumers,” said Bill Marler, a food safety lawyer who represented several of the victims in the PCA outbreak.

“Although his sentence is less than the maximum, it is the longest sentence ever in a food poisoning case,” Marler said. “This sentence is going to send a stiff, cold wind through board rooms across the U.S.”

For Jeff Almer, Parnell’s sentencing brought relief. He had been seeking justice for his mother, Shirley Mae Almer, who died in late 2008 after eating salmonella-tainted peanut butter. Still, the day was filled with mixed emotions.

“I am satisfied there were convictions and now jail terms,” he said. “But less so in that all this could have been avoided.”

A deadly outbreak in 2008

The 2008 salmonella outbreak traced back to peanut butter paste manufactured by PCA killed nine people and sickened 714 others, some critically, across 46 states. It was the deadliest salmonella outbreak in recent years and resulted in one of the largest food recalls in American history — from Keebler crackers to Famous Amos cookies to the snack packets handed out on airlines.

Suddenly, one of America’s favorite foods had turned into a killer.

Parnell invoked the Fifth Amendment when called to testify before Congress and had never publicly spoken about the tragedy until Monday, when he expressed remorse in the courtroom. His family members also testified Monday on behalf of his character and asked for mercy.

His lawyer, Scott Austin, said Parnell was devastated by the 28-year sentence. Parnell has maintained all along that his company engaged in commercial fraud but that he was not aware of it.

But the loved ones of those who died asked that Parnell pay for his deeds.

Almer, who traveled with his sister from Minnesota to make his statement in court, blames Parnell for his mother’s death and had been waiting for this day in court. He said he has grown weary from constant talk of his mother’s death for almost seven years.

His grief and his anger toward PCA turned him into a food safety activist. Before Parnell’s sentencing, Almer and other family members of victims sent U.S. District Court Judge W. Louis Sands a letter asking for $500,000 in restitution that would go to food safety groups.

“We have lost our loved ones and have worked hard to help to prevent this from happening to others,” said the letter, which Almer shared with CNN. “Our request is not a selfish request; we only ask that you assign any monies to aid families who have suffered or are suffering from food borne illnesses.”

Carl Tobias, a University of Richmond law professor, said Parnell’s sentence will make corporate executives think twice before engaging in wrongful activities.

“I don’t have the impression that Parnell set out to kill people,” Tobias said. “He just ran his business in a way that caused a lot of injury and some deaths. The sentence was appropriate and maybe it should have been stiffer.”

Kevin Pollock, whose company Stericycle ExpertSOLUTIONS helps handle brand recalls, said various foods are recalled every year because of bacterial contaminations, which can lead to illness. The PCA case, he said, is historic in that a corporate executive was held accountable with a prison term for knowingly distributing tainted food.

“Manufacturers already pay attention, but they will take note that if they were to fail, there can be serious ramifications,” Pollock said.

Activists have been working for years to get tough with enacting and enforcing food safety laws.

The Food and Drug Administration estimates that every year, 48 million people — one out of six — suffer from food-borne illnesses. More than 100,000 people are hospitalized and about 3,000 die from infections the federal government says are largely preventable.

In early 2011, as a result of the campaign launched in the aftermath of the PCA outbreak, President Barack Obama signed the Food Safety Modernization Act, which the FDA called the most sweeping reform in food safety laws in 70 years.

For the first time, the law took aim at preventing food-borne illnesses rather than just responding to contamination that had already occurred. The new law gave the FDA the power to suspend a facility’s ability to sell food in American markets and detain food that may be contaminated.

Advocates: Stronger law, weak funding

The problem, say food safety advocates, is there is not yet adequate funding for the FDA to fully enforce the law.

Marler, the lawyer who has represented victims of all sorts of food-borne outbreaks, said he was relieved that his clients in the PCA case are seeing justice. But he said more needs to be done on the front end — before tragedy strikes.

“I’d rather Stewart Parnell never go to jail, [and] that the outbreak had never happened.”

At trial last year, prosecutors called 45 witnesses and presented more than 1,000 documents including months of emails, lab results and financial records to make their case that Parnell knew about the contamination, covered it up and ordered PCA to continue shipments of salmonella-tainted peanut paste used to manufacture a variety of products.

The prosecution’s blistering opening statement contained three now-infamous words Parnell wrote in a March 2007 email to a plant manager about contaminated products: “Just ship it.”

Defense statements and witnesses, which took all of 104 minutes, portrayed Parnell as a small-business owner who was scapegoated by the government. Defense attorneys argued that Parnell did not know about mismanagement at the plant and that he was the fall guy for other employees’ wrongdoing.

The prosecution was a rarity, Marler said, because the Department of Justice charged the Parnell brothers with felonies. Prior cases involved misdemeanors.

“Prosecutors took a risk and fortunately, the jury believed them,” Marler said. “The jury saw this for what it was. The emails and documents told a story of a company that was more interested in shipping out products than products that were safe.”

Most common food-borne illness

Salmonella is America’s most common cause of food-borne illness and sickens up to 1.4 million people every year.

A current outbreak of salmonella from cucumbers has infected 418 people in 31 states, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The Arizona Daily Star reported the death of a woman after eating a tainted cucumber.

In the PCA outbreak, former company employees described filthy conditions at the plant in southwest Georgia. Federal inspectors found roaches, rats, mold, dirt, accumulated grease and bird droppings during their raid. They also found a leaky roof.

Salmonella is often associated with meat, poultry, eggs and raw milk — products from animals that are carriers of the bacteria. It also thrives in the intestines of birds and can be found in fruits and vegetables and in ingredients made from them.

The presence of water in what is supposed to be a dry processing facility for peanuts is like adding gasoline to fire for salmonella, food safety experts say.

Health officials discovered similar poor conditions at PCA’s other processing plant in Plainview, Texas. The company filed for Chapter 7 bankruptcy protection shortly after it was shut down.

Two former plant managers worked out deals with the government in exchange for their testimony.

“The sentence that was handed down today means that executives will no longer be able to hide behind the corporate veil,” said U.S. Attorney Michael J. Moore of the Middle District of Georgia.

“The tragedy of this case is that at a peanut processing plant in Middle Georgia, protecting the public lost out to increasing of profits. This case was never just about shipping tainted peanut product; it was about making sure individual wrong doers were held accountable and the losses suffered by the victims and their families are never forgotten.”

By Moni Basu, CNN

Read more

(breitbart) – GUTFELD: ‘MAYBE TRUMP IS THE RIGHT-WING OBAMA’

On Tuesday’s broadcast of “The Five,” Fox News Channel host Greg Gutfeld stated that GOP presidential candidate Donald Trump may be “the right-wing Obama,” but that maybe Trump can “speak to the America currently held captive by liberal media and entertainment.” Although he added Trump “must convince us that he’s actually more than just a pretty, red persona.”

Gutfeld said, after playing a montage of Trump’s speech in Dallas “so this is the historical first, Republican style. Forget the first female in Hillary, or the first African-American in Obama. No, this historical first is celebrity. Entertainment is the new black. Do this exercise, imagine some politician saying what Trump just said, he’d be toast. But Trump has a bubble of immunity. He says, I’m ‘an entertainer,’ declaring himself a member of a new identity group that affords a protection. True, it has some drawbacks. It’s creepy watching starry-eyed men in the media fawn over him, but who does that remind you of?” Gutfeld then played clips of various media figures praising President Obama.

He continued, “So maybe Trump is the right-wing Obama, attracting both fan boys, but impervious to gaffes. How did this happen? Why? To quote the late Andrew Breitbart, ‘Politics is downstream from culture,’ meaning culture influences politics, not the reverse. And may be that culture candidate. He’s the guy from TV, not DC. His impact flows downstream to politics, so it’s less a campaign, and more a comedic crusade appealing to the bored and fed up. The fact is, the right’s been apart from culture for so long, that maybe it takes a TV star to build that bridge, and speak to the America currently held captive by liberal media and entertainment. Trump’s got problems. He can be crass, repetitious. I wish he would say something deep for once about terrorism. I wish he would read more and riff less. He’s a gamble. One that must convince us that he’s actually more than just a pretty, red persona. Or not, he could win as is. Well, unless the Dems wise up and run Clooney.”

Gutfeld later added, that while he agreed Trump does appeal to frustration with DC, “he’s going to have to talk about actual issues and specifics.” And that he thought Trump’s Dallas speech was “very repetitious,” and that he wants “depth.”

Gutfeld also argued, “you’re having the most ideological component of the Republican Party supporting the least ideological candidate in history,” but that he’s [Gutfeld] “not ideological,” and that Trump is a “warts and all” candidate.

He further stated that “it’s hard to square off with an entertainer as a policy person or a politician, because you can’t say those things, and he can. It’s just like Barack Obama.”

Gutfeld concluded that Trump’s comments about Senator John McCain (R-AZ)  43%

 “drove me crazy,” and wondered “what does it say about us?” That Trump could survive it. Although he agreed that everyone who goes after Trump sees their popularity suffer.

(h/t Mediaite)

 

(al.com) – Pope Francis in America: Live stream, schedule, appearances, Congressional address

Sign painters move their scaffolding into position to continue painting a portrait of Pope Francis on the side of a New York City office building, Friday, Aug. 28, 2015. The Pope visits the U.S. beginning Sept. 22 with stops in Washington D.C., New York and Philadelphia. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan) (Mark Lennihan)

 

Pope Francis will be making his first U.S. visit this week, kicking off with his arrival from Cuba on Sept. 22. The Pope has appearances scheduled for Washington, D.C., New York and Philadelphia over the coming days.

Schedule of events

Sept. 19-22: Pope Francis arrives in Washington D.C. on Tuesday, Sept. 22 at 3 p.m. CST.

Wednesday, Sept. 23:
8:15 a.m.: Welcome ceremony and meeting with President Obama at the White House.
10 a.m.: Papal Parade along the Ellipse and the National Mall
10:30 a.m.: Midday prayer with the bishops of the United States, St. Matthew’s Cathedral.
3:15 p.m.: Mass of Canonization of Junipero Serra at the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception.

Thursday, Sept. 24
8:20 a.m.: Address to joint session of Congress. The Pope is the first Roman Catholic leader to address Congress. You can watch live here.
10:15 a.m.: Visit to St. Patrick’s Catholic Church in D.C.
4 p.m.: Arrival at John F. Kennedy International Airport, New York.
5:45 p.m.: Evening prayer at St. Patrick’s Cathedral in NYC.

Friday, Sept. 25
7:30 a.m.: Visit to the United Nations and address to the United Nations General Assembly. U.N. says the pope also will meet with Secretary-General Ban Ki during his visit.
10:30 a.m.: Multi-religious service at 9/11 Memorial and Museum, World Trade Center
3 p.m.: Visit to Our Lady Queen of Angels School, East Harlem
4 p.m.: Procession through Central Park
5 p.m.: Mass at Madison Square Garden

Saturday, Sept. 26
9:30 a.m.: Mass at Cathedral Basilica of Sts. Peter and Paul, Philadelphia.
3:45 p.m.: Visit to Independence Mall
6:30 p.m.: Visit to the Festival of Families

Sunday, Sept. 27
8:15 a.m.: Meeting with bishops, cardinals and seminarians at St. Martin’s Chapel, St. Charles Borromeo Seminary
10 a.m.: Visit to Curran-Fromhold Correctional Facility
3 p.m.: Mass for the conclusion of the World Meeting of Families
6 p.m.: Visit with organizers, volunteers and benefactors of the World Meeting of Families, Atlantic Aviation

7 p.m. Departure for Rome.

Seeing the Papal events

People will be pouring in to Washington, D.C., New York and Philadelphia for a chance to see the Pope but those at home will have an opportunity, too.

How you can watch the Pope

Live streaming

  • Time Warner’s Papal Visit Channel will stream online atTWCNews.com/papalvisit and on the Time Warner News app (iTunes andGoogle Play). Online and app access require Time Warner IDs.
  • The United States Conference of Catholic Bishops will live stream all events onusccb.org.

Social media

The U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops will be updating with information and photos from the Pope’s visit on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram and more. You can see all those channels here.

First U.S. Canonization

Pope Francis will be leading the canonization service for Father Junipero Serra, the first such mass ever held in the U.S. The ceremony will be held Sept. 23 the Basilica of the National Shrine of the Immaculate Conception, the nation’s largest Catholic church.

Serra, a Spanish native who was sent to California in 1769 to spread the gospel, died in 1784. He is buried at Mission San Carlos Borromeo in Carmel. His sainthood has been protested by Native Americans due to his treatment of Indian populations in California.

Congressional address

Pope Francis will address a joint session of Congress Thursday at 8:20 a.m. The address is not without controversy among Republicans, who disagree with the Pope on issues such as global warming and immigration.

Arizona Republican Rep. Paul Gosar, a Catholic, already said he plans to skip the debate.

 

Read More

(state.gov) – Briefing from Mr. John Kirby 09/21/15

John Kirby
Spokesperson
Daily Press Briefing
Washington, DC
September 21, 2015

 

TRANSCRIPT:

2:06 p.m. EDT

QUESTION: Wait a second. Where did you just come from?

MR KIRBY: My office.

QUESTION: Okay.

MR KIRBY: Would you like me to come from somewhere else?

QUESTION: Well, out of the floor, obviously.

MR KIRBY: Well, I can do that too.

QUESTION: I mean, what is this, a new trend you’re starting?

QUESTION: You’re breaking the fourth wall.

MR KIRBY: No. Nobody’s ever —

QUESTION: You go to London and Berlin for the weekend, you come back, and you come in the back door.

MR KIRBY: Nobody has ever accused me of being trendy, Matt.

Just a couple of things at the top. I think you all heard Secretary Kerry yesterday announce that the United States is going to admit 85,000 refugees from around the world in Fiscal Year ’16, and then a hundred thousand for Fiscal Year ’17. In consultation with Congress, we’re going to continue to explore ways to increase those figures. This is, obviously, as the Secretary said, a step in keeping with America’s best tradition as a land of second chances and a beacon of hope.

In accordance with these same traditions, this step will be accompanied by continued financial contributions to the humanitarian effort, not only from our government, but from the American people. The need is enormous, but we are determined to answer the call while maintaining robust security, and it is a balance that we know we need to strike. Our priority has long been to provide assistance that helps people in the places to which they have fled, communities and neighboring countries that have so generously hosted those refugees.

As you also probably saw just a little bit ago, my colleague at the White House announced that the United States will provide nearly $419 million in additional lifesaving assistance for those affected by the war in Syria. That brings the total of our contributions to some $4.5 billion since the start of the crisis.

Obviously, the United States remains committed to assisting those affected by this conflict, and we strongly urge all governments, organizations, individuals concerned about the situation to support the lifesaving aid efforts of the UN and other partners.

Turning now to Indonesia, Secretary Kerry welcomed Indonesian Foreign Minister Marsudi to the State Department earlier today. In that session the Secretary announced President Jokowi’s upcoming trip to Washington to meet with President Obama on the 26th of October. In their meeting, the Secretary and the foreign minister discussed regional and global issues such as climate change and the centrality of ASEAN. The Secretary also discussed bilateral trade and investment opportunities as well as ways that we can cooperate to support Indonesia’s economic development and maritime goals. Our relations with Indonesia are strong and they’re expanding. As the world’s third largest democracy, Indonesia’s example as a pluralistic democracy with a tradition of tolerance is hugely important, as are its leadership on regional global issues.

Turning to Nepal, the United States congratulates the people of Nepal on their steadfast commitment to democracy. The promulgation of the constitution is an important milestone in Nepal’s democratic journey. The government must continue efforts to accommodate the views of all Nepalis and ensure that the constitution embraces measures consistent with globally accepted norms and principles, including gender equality, religious freedom, and the right to citizenship. We encourage all Nepalis to continue to engage in the democratic process through peaceful, nonviolent means. And we call on Nepali security forces to exercise restraint as people express those democratic rights. The United States stands ready to assist the people and the Government of Nepal as they continue along this democratic path and to rebuild from the April earthquake.

Read More

(ABC News) – Hillary Clinton Says She Would Be a Political ‘Outsider’ as President

 

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton speaks while attending the Foundry United Methodist Church for their Bicentennial Homecoming Celebration, in Washington, Sept. 13, 2015.

Hillary Clinton argued today that as president she would be as much a political outsider as any other candidate given that she would be the first female president.

“I cannot imagine anyone being more of an outsider than the first woman president, I mean really, let’s think about it,” the Democratic presidential candidate said during an interview on CBS News’ “Face the Nation.”

“All these mothers and fathers bring me the place mats with all the presidents, and they bring their daughters and they say, ‘My daughter has a question for you,'” the former senator and secretary of state explained Sunday. “And then the daughter says, ‘How come there are no girls on this place mat?’ So, I think that is a pretty big, unconventional choice.”

When pressed further, Clinton acknowledged that “political outsiders” could refer to candidates who have never held public office. But, she argued, those people would not be as effective as she would be as president.

“I know what you’re asking, ‘Do we want people who have never been elected to anything, who have no political experience, who’ve never made any hard choices in the public arena?’ Well, voters are going to have to decide that,” she said.

Clinton’s comments could be seen as a knock against Republican presidential candidates Donald Trump, Ben Carson and Carly Fiorina — none of whom have ever been elected to public office, but are leading in the Republican polls.

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, however, is also admired for being a political outsider by progressives. He is seeing massive support, gaining steadily in the polls, and even leading Clinton in New Hampshire.

During her interview today, Clinton also brushed aside the notion that she isn’t authentic and doesn’t show her “real” self out on the campaign trail.

“I can’t possibly do that,” Clinton said when asked to name three adjectives that describe her. “Look, I am a real person. With all the pluses and minuses that go along with it.”

Read More

(washington post) – Dozens of fighters are defecting from the Islamic State. Here’s why.

 

A photograph taken from a video released on Jan. 4, 2014, by the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant’s al-Furqan Media allegedly shows fighters marching at an undisclosed location. (Agence France-Presse via Getty Images)

By Karla Adam

LONDON — At least 58 people have gone public after defecting from the Islamic State, and their voices could help deter others from joining, according to a new report.

The testimony of defectors shatters the Islamic State’s image “as a united, cohesive and ideologically committed organization,” says the report, published Monday by the Institute for Strategic Dialogue and the International Center for the Study of Radicalization and Political Violence (ICSR) at King’s College London.

ICSR urged governments to remove “legal disincentives” that dissuade defectors from going public and to help with resettlement and safety issues, arguing that defectors’ voices can be a powerful counterweight to the Islamic State’s slick propaganda.

“We don’t think all defectors are saints, or supporters of liberal democracy, or model citizens,” said Peter Neumann, the head of ICSR. “But their narratives and arguments are still valuable because they are speaking from a position of authority and experience and credibility that no one else has.”

Titled “Victims, Perpetrators, Assets: The Narratives of Islamic State Defectors,” the report relied on previously published accounts of several dozen people who have left the organization, including testimony from seven women.

[A provocative article calls the Islamic State a mystery. Here’s why it’s wrong. ]

According to the researchers, the defectors who have opted to go public represent just the tip of the iceberg, with the vast majority who manage to leave simply walking away quietly. Authorities here estimate that half of the 700 Britons who have left to join the Islamic State have returned to the United Kingdom. Of the defectors surveyed by the researchers, two were British.

The reasons for leaving are varied, the report said. Defectors expressed outrage over brutality toward Sunni Muslims and frustration about infighting and behaviors deemed un-Islamic.

Others found their duties “dull” and lacking the kind if glamorous heroism they expected the battlefield would bring.

Others still were disappointed by daily life in the Islamic State’s self-declared “caliphate,” which covers large swaths of Iraq and Syria and where issues such as electricity shortages represent a reality markedly different from the paradise peddled by the Islamic State’s propaganda.

“A small but significant number of the defectors expressed disappointment about living conditions and the quality of life. They were typically among the ones who had joined the group for material and ‘selfish’ reasons, and quickly realized that none of the luxury goods and cars that they had been promised would materialize,” the report said.

The researchers said they were concerned about the accuracy of the accounts, given that defectors may conclude that anything they say could come back to haunt them in court — or worse. But the researchers said that for the most part, “their narratives have been so strong and consistent that we are confident that our broader assessments remain valid.”

One such defector, a 33-year-old Iraqi identified as “Hamza” by the Independent newspaper, told the paper in March that he quit ISIS after being asked to help with executions and being offered 13 Yazidi girls for sex.

“These scenes terrified me. I imagined myself being caught up in these shootings, executions, beheadings and raping, if I stayed where I was,” he told the paper.

An Indian man named Areeb Majeed reportedly spent much of his time in the Islamic State performing menial jobs such as cleaning toilets.

“There was neither a holy war nor any of the preachings in the holy book were followed,” he told investigators last year, according to the Times of India.

[Indian who joined Islamic State got a job cleaning toilets]

It’s not easy to leave the militant group, the report says, with defectors well aware that there could be deadly consequences if they are caught.

Neumann, of ICSR, praised the State Department’s Center for Strategic Counterterrorism Communications for its Twitter campaign that highlights stories from defectors.

[In a propaganda war, the U.S. tried to play by the enemy’s rules]

But he said that many of the disillusioned are not speaking up because they fear reprisals, and that if lawmakers want to undercut recruitment, they should offer defectors more protection.

“What we are saying is not that people should necessarily be given an amnesty. That would be stupid because some may have committed crimes,” he said. “But at the very least, it should be counted as a mitigating factor when it comes to sentencing.”

Karla Adam is a reporter in the Washington Post’s London bureau. Before joining the Post in 2006, she worked as a freelancer in London for the New York Times and People magazine.

Read More

Skip to toolbar